Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 10th Mar 2010 23:58 UTC
In the News If you thought the growing criticism directed at the United States Patent and Trademark Office would force them to rethink their strategies in granting patents, you're most likely wrong. After a re-examination that took more than four years, the USPTO has reconfirmed Amazon's ominous one-click patent.
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RE: Why the surprise?
by cb_osn on Thu 11th Mar 2010 01:35 UTC in reply to "Why the surprise?"
cb_osn
Member since:
2006-02-26

So now, the Decepticrats believe that the Govt. is now Competent(??) to make decisions about Health Care (Aaarrgghh!!)

Any incompetence of a representative democracy like the US government can only be the fault of its citizens. It is the responsibility of the governed to take an active and participatory role in a democratic government. Unfortunately, we have an increasingly apathetic electorate in this country which leads to people abandoning their own responsibility and then blaming all problems on the incompetence of the governing body.

The optimist in me hopes that people will realize this before it's too late, but the pessimist fears that it will take a second coming of the "dark ages" before people realize that democracy is not a panacea, and without active participation from an educated electorate, quickly degenerates into something indistinguishable from fascism.

Reply Parent Score: 12

RE[2]: Why the surprise?
by No it isnt on Thu 11th Mar 2010 11:56 in reply to "RE: Why the surprise?"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

You really believe that? The electoral system makes it very difficult for a third party to get any real political power, and the advertisment driven media makes it impossible to get much attention on a national level without the financial support from, well, people with money, i.e. corporations and organisations with an interest in maintaining the status quo. Who do you think the politicians represent?

Change == small change, lower/higher taxes, a high/higher preference for the very rich.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Why the surprise?
by nemesys571 on Thu 11th Mar 2010 17:16 in reply to "RE[2]: Why the surprise?"
nemesys571 Member since:
2010-03-11

If you had the experience of witnessing the political process of other countries with political systems modeled after the US, you would know that third, fourth, and even more parties can have a real chance and a meaningful voice. That is the case in Dominican Republic, for example. The US bi-partisan system though is very limited, but that bi-partisanship is not a definition of representative democracy, it's just the way things evolved in the US.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Why the surprise?
by boldingd on Thu 11th Mar 2010 20:34 in reply to "RE[2]: Why the surprise?"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

The politicians represent the voters. Politicians can't get elected without votes. If an alliance with a certain business interest is going to cost a politician an election, then they'll drop it, regardless of how much money that business group (or lobby or PAC) brings to the table. Or, they'll lose the election.

Did you notice how the Democrats took over Congress in 2006, and won the Presidency in 2008, despite the fact that they they're not usually thought of as the pro-business party? That was because lots and lots of voters where really, really dissatisfied with the results of Republican rule, so much so that pretty much no amount of lobbyist/corporate money was going to buy the Republican party a win. You know those fiscally conservative Blue Dog Democrats? You know why they're like that? Because they represent their districts: they come from conservative districts, and if they want to keep their seats, they have to represent the desires of their electorate, regardless of their personal convictions or party affiliations. Those guys are living proof that the electorate still calls the shots, in American democracy: lobbyist money doesn't even enter into that equation.

While the large amount of influence that lobbies have in politics in the States is a problem, the greater and more fundamental danger really is the apathy (or ignorance) of the voters. Politicians will swiftly take any action on the really big issues we care about, when gaining or loosing votes are at stake. And IP policy isn't such an issue.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Why the surprise?
by StychoKiller on Fri 12th Mar 2010 01:53 in reply to "RE[2]: Why the surprise?"
StychoKiller Member since:
2005-09-20

Ah, you mean like the Senator from Exxon, or the Congressman from Goldman-Sachs, etc. Yeah, I'm cynical enough to see what the Govt. does, and NOT believe what they say they're gonna do!

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Why the surprise?
by FunkyELF on Thu 11th Mar 2010 15:05 in reply to "RE: Why the surprise?"
FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

Any incompetence of a representative democracy like the US government can only be the fault of its citizens. It is the responsibility of the governed to take an active and participatory role in a democratic government. Unfortunately, we have an increasingly apathetic electorate in this country which leads to people abandoning their own responsibility and then blaming all problems on the incompetence of the governing body.

The optimist in me hopes that people will realize this before it's too late, but the pessimist fears that it will take a second coming of the "dark ages" before people realize that democracy is not a panacea, and without active participation from an educated electorate, quickly degenerates into something indistinguishable from fascism.


How can we stand up when they're too powerful and can lock you up for anything. We have laws that conflict with each other. If you obey the constitution you get locked up for 30 years. Ed and Elaine Brown are spending the rest of their lives in jail for questioning the government.

Speaking of constitution, do you know if you're living in a constitution free zone?...
http://www.aclu.org/national-security_technology-and-liberty/are-yo...

Another good read on the conflict between law and constitution...
https://www.checkpointusa.org/

I'd like to stand up and do something but I don't want to sit in jail. Ron Paul is the only politician one who cares about this stuff but voting for him is throwing your vote away.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Why the surprise?
by boldingd on Thu 11th Mar 2010 20:37 in reply to "RE[2]: Why the surprise?"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

The whole reason Civil Disobedience works is because you get locked up. Because you force the government to choose between trying to incarcerate a large chunk of their populace, or changing an unjust law. If you're not willing to risk getting locked up, it's a fair bet you're not really that outraged.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Why the surprise?
by StychoKiller on Fri 12th Mar 2010 01:33 in reply to "RE[2]: Why the surprise?"
StychoKiller Member since:
2005-09-20

I'd rather "Throw my vote away", than help either the Republicons or Decepticrats remain in power!

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Why the surprise?
by StychoKiller on Fri 12th Mar 2010 01:34 in reply to "RE: Why the surprise?"
StychoKiller Member since:
2005-09-20

“When the people find that they can vote themselves money, that will herald
the end of the republic.” — Benjamin Franklin

The laws need to change so that ONLY people that actually pay taxes get to vote in elections!

Reply Parent Score: 1