Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 11th Mar 2010 22:59 UTC
Benchmarks Common wisdom has it that Flash is a resource hog, and that HTML5 will prevent your processor from having to work really, really hard to show animations of videos. Well, a number of people have conducted benchmarks with the latest browsers and Flash betas, and common wisdom is starting to show serious signs of crackage.
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curious
by theorz on Thu 11th Mar 2010 23:28 UTC
theorz
Member since:
2006-01-08

I am really curious what hardware acceleration they are using that is not available on non-windows platforms. Is this really a matter of platform does not support at all, or is it a matter of they used an API that is only on windows.

While I think just using OpenGL would be good enough for typical flash uses, I can understand them not wanting to use it due to things like lack of control over sub-pixel rendering. Which is why I wonder what they are using on windows. Direct2d would make some sense, but I am wondering if they would want that or go lower level.

Also the linux side is not so weird anymore. As Opera has shown with their use of gstreamer in their newest version, choosing the leading solution is good enough. It will work just fine with all the normal distros, and fringe people can take care of themselves.

Reply Score: 1

RE: curious
by Verunks on Fri 12th Mar 2010 00:41 in reply to "curious"
Verunks Member since:
2007-04-02

Adobe wants to use the h264 decoder integrated in most gpu, on linux you can do that with nvidia's vdpau but I guess there is no way to do it on mac os x

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: curious
by Ford Prefect on Fri 12th Mar 2010 08:59 in reply to "curious"
Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

They should get their facts straight. Linux is more than ready for hardware accelerated video playback. Currently there are the VA-API and VDPAU APIs. The latter is only available on nVidia cards, but there exists a VDPAU backend to VA-API, so you can use VA-API everywhere.

I use VDPAU for months now to watch 1080p content with mplayer. I also tested VA-API, but not on nVidia, instead on a GMA500.

I tried Flash 10.1beta3 under Windows and the hardware acceleration somewhat works. However it crashes sometimes and sometimes is unrecoverable (you only see the green box) until reboot.

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE: curious
by deathshadow on Fri 12th Mar 2010 10:41 in reply to "curious"
deathshadow Member since:
2005-07-12

I am really curious what hardware acceleration they are using that is not available on non-windows platforms. Is this really a matter of platform does not support at all, or is it a matter of they used an API that is only on windows.

Given that flash 10.1 with h.264 playback seems to have really good acceleration on Ion even under XP I'm actually wondering what API they are using to get at the GPU in the first place. Since it reportedly does nVidia, Intel and ATI that rules out both CUDA and ATI 'streams' - it can't be directCompute because that's DX10+ only, I'm wondering if they did it in shader language - in which case one questions why it's NOT available on other platforms; excepting openGL won't let you run a shader instance without a GL Surface initialized, something not entirely easy to integrate into a browser plugin - while DirectX will let you run shader language code directly without initializing Direct3D... So that's the most likely route for implementation IMHO. (or at least that's my understanding of it - I could be way off base since I'm barely scratching the surface on writing OpenGL code atop SDL and still can't make sense of programming DirectX)

While I think just using OpenGL would be good enough for typical flash uses

All it would offer is blitting and scaling - which sure 20 years ago was the huge bottleneck when our encoding was a joke as was the resolution ... Today it's all about the codec and OpenGL doesn't do encode/decode. That's what OpenCL is for...

Someday OpenCL might make a dent, but it's fighting being beat to market by at least three years in the case of CUDA, and the sheer 500 pound gorilla that DirectCompute is thanks to the number of people using windows. Even with Leoptard beating DX11 to market, it really doesn't matter.

Reply Parent Score: 2