Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 16th Mar 2010 16:54 UTC
Internet Explorer As predicted, more Microsoft news from MIX10, and this is some big stuff: Internet Explorer 9. As we all know, Microsoft really let Internet Explorer rot away, allowing competitors to make much better browsers with better standards compliance and performance. With IE9, Microsoft is aiming to not just close that gap - but to overtake the competition. Update: Ars has an in-depth look at the platform preview.
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lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

And if they do join the fight, whatever they do will probably be definitive, and it surely won't be Vorbis.


Vorbis is an audio code, the open video codec from Xiph.org is called Theora.

But why not support Theora (and Vorbis for that matter) out of the box? What is stopping them? What would it hurt?

Default support for Theora in all HTML5-capable browsers is entirely in line with the original design intent of the web. h264 is not.

Reply Parent Score: 4

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Vorbis is an audio code, the open video codec from Xiph.org is called Theora.

But why not support Theora (and Vorbis for that matter) out of the box? What is stopping them? What would it hurt?

Default support for Theora in all HTML5-capable browsers is entirely in line with the original design intent of the web. h264 is not.


More code to manage, audit (for IP purposes), maintain for a very limited scope of customers that can't be justified when compared to other things that are of more importance. If the Theora boosters want it to be adopted then they should provide a DirectShow CODEC that allows encoding and decoding. Nothing has stopped the Theora boosters except for apologists like you who expect everyone else to do the heavy lifting so that you can feel warm and fuzzy about your technology of choice.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

More code to manage, audit (for IP purposes), maintain for a very limited scope of customers that can't be justified when compared to other things that are of more importance. If the Theora boosters want it to be adopted then they should provide a DirectShow CODEC that allows encoding and decoding. Nothing has stopped the Theora boosters except for apologists like you who expect everyone else to do the heavy lifting so that you can feel warm and fuzzy about your technology of choice.


If the burden of auditing code for license compliance is a concern, then Theora is by far the better choice to support. Infinitely so.

There are no parties asking for license fees for Theora.

Despite your ranting, it is the browser and OS vendors who must provide the support, not the designers of the codec. This is just as true for h264 as it is for Theora.

Reply Parent Score: 3