Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 19th Mar 2010 14:15 UTC
Internet & Networking Now that Internet Explorer 9 has been let out its cage, we all know a great deal more about Microsoft's position towards the video codec situation with the HTML5 video tag. Microsoft has chosen for H264, a codec it already includes in Windows by default anyway. This means that apart from Firefox and Opera, every other major browser will support H264. Some are seeing this as a reason for Mozilla to give in to their ideals and include support for H264 as well - I say: Mozilla, stick to your ideals. The last people you should be listening to in matters like this are web developers.
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RE[4]: Ideals are great
by baryluk on Fri 19th Mar 2010 19:10 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Ideals are great"
baryluk
Member since:
2010-01-02

The GStreamer support is fully implemented in Opera 10.50 (which is released for Windows, in beta for OS X and in alpha for Unix), but they don't use DirectShow or QuickTime. In Linux/BSD they use the existing GStreamer installation, so Opera can play anything that GStreamer can handle (including h264 if you have the codec installed).

In Windows and OS X they install a minimal installation of GStreamer that can only handle Vorbis, Theora and PCM. As for adding other codecs on Win/Mac you can't do it as you would in Linux/BSD, since Opera's version of GStreamer misses a lot of things, including the plug-in system.

Actually Opera is first developer to port gstremer to non-unix environmnet. Becuase they had not so much time they ported only most important thing, is using DirectX to display image and audio (but actuall encoding is done in gstremer). If they had more time, or support from gstremer developer (which are esentially all Linux guys) they could easly support other codecs.

They are probably doing this already, or done it for Windows, but are not shiping with H.264 enabled both for licensing issues, and for political reasons. On Linux it (h264) works in Opera, and esentially codec stuff are much easier to por than core framework. codec is mostly some CPU algorithms, which will just easly recompile to ther target. Core stuff is harder as it interacts with whole system (threading, windowing system, etc.).

This is not a technical problem to support all this stuff now. It is political.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Ideals are great
by Stratoukos on Fri 19th Mar 2010 19:28 in reply to "RE[4]: Ideals are great"
Stratoukos Member since:
2009-02-11

Actually Opera is first developer to port gstremer to non-unix environmnet. Becuase they had not so much time they ported only most important thing, is using DirectX to display image and audio (but actuall encoding is done in gstremer).


Actually Opera isn't the first to port GStreamer to Windows. The first release of the GStreamer WinBuilds project was on late 2008. As for using DirectX, this is just how GStreamer works. It doesn't interface itself with the hardware, but it interfaces with another API (OSS or ALSA in Linux) that interfaces with the actual hardware. The API that speaks to the hardware in Windows is DirectX, so that's what they used. And, as you said, not porting enough of GStreamer to support h264 was a political decision and had nothing to do with Opera's timeframe. A developer said that supporting every codec under the sun wasn't their aim and that's why their version of GStreamer only supports their core codecs (Vorbis, Theora, PCM). Supporting more that these on systems that already have GStreamer is just a side effect.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Ideals are great
by KClowers on Sat 20th Mar 2010 18:21 in reply to "RE[5]: Ideals are great"
KClowers Member since:
2009-12-18

Actually Opera isn't the first to port GStreamer to Windows. The first release of the GStreamer WinBuilds project was on late 2008.


Indeed, and Songbird uses GStreamer on all platforms as well.

Reply Parent Score: 1