Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 19th Mar 2010 13:00 UTC, submitted by Jim Lynch
General Development "With chip makers continuing to increase the number of cores they include on each new generation of their processors, perhaps it's time to rethink the basic architecture of today's operating systems, suggested Dave Probert, a kernel architect within the Windows core operating systems division at Microsoft."
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RE: Comment by twitterfire
by samad on Fri 19th Mar 2010 20:59 UTC in reply to "Comment by twitterfire"
samad
Member since:
2006-03-31

GPUs are specialized for doing parallel arithmetic operations. Specifically, a GPU can perform a vector sum in one cycle, whereas the CPU would require more cycles. The problem with your suggestion is that the kernel doesn't spend most of its time doing vector sums, but instead things like interrupt handling and context switching.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by twitterfire
by twitterfire on Fri 19th Mar 2010 23:36 in reply to "RE: Comment by twitterfire"
twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

I think that when we are watching flash videos on youtube, listen to mp3s, play movies, using some compression or cryptography software, we make heavy use of SIMD instructions and vector arithmetics. So why not use some GPU muscle?

Reply Parent Score: 1

PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

True. We should have a model where people can offload that work to the GPU. We're starting down that road (DXVA for video, DirectCompute for more generic stuff). We try doing our best.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by twitterfire
by Morgan on Sun 21st Mar 2010 02:31 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by twitterfire"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Adobe is doing just that, starting with Nvidia chipsets. It's Windows only for now (as far as I know anyway), but it looks promising.

http://www.nvidia.com/object/io_1243934217700.html

Reply Parent Score: 2