Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 00:07 UTC, submitted by Jim Lynch
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu How surprised would you be, if I walked up to you and told you that every human needs oxygen to survive? I'm assuming that you wouldn't at all be surprised - you might start feeling a little uneasy that a random stranger walked up to you with such a crazy question, but you wouldn't be surprised by the we-need-oxygen fact. Apparently, people are surprised that Ubuntu is not a democracy.
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Democracy
by Neolander on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 08:19 UTC
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

Sure, open source is not democracy, but as of today we still have the right to choose our dictator, and I think that shuttleworth's product will disappear from my PC once a competitor is mature enough.

For years, I've been struggling with ubuntu breaking some things because it looks cool.

-The free radeon driver (don't remember when, but they ditched it in a release and let me forced to use the marvellous AMD linux driver on my old radeon 9600, eventually leaving X always crashing)
-Audio (On 8.04 and 9.10, due to pulseaudio nonsense. But oh well, being able to play sound over a network is so much better than stability...)

And now, they're going to push forward new windows buttons just because they look cool and different, and do it horribly wrong. Close button must be quickly accessible, and that's why it has to be put in a corner. On a system where menus are nested in the windows, buttons should be on the right, because it avoids accidentally pushing them when trying to click on a menu. And let's not think about the fact that about every Ubuntu user comes from the Windows and Mac OS X world and actually likes that some things still work the same way.

Don't know where I'm going. I'm getting fed up with the linux world, with Fedora being too much experimental for everyday use, OpenSUSE being more bloated than Windows and more silly about drivers than Debian, Mandriva being unable to switch to the standard-compliant Network manager since so many years.

More generally, I'm getting fed up with those projects which simply don't seem to understand that UNIX won't adapt itself to GUI operation by tweaking X11, that it was designed with console work and procedural programming in mind and has several major design flaws in that area (like a X11 crash making you loose all data in opened applications).

Maybe going to code haiku drivers for my hardware. Maybe going back to Windows or ReactOS, Windows 7 is not that bad when you look at it. Maybe taking a look at those x86-compatible AmigaOS clones. But having found only one ubuntu release (9.04) satisfying my needs in a while is not enough. Once it dies, I'll go somewhere else.

Edited 2010-03-22 08:37 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Democracy
by Anonymous Coward on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 10:32 in reply to "Democracy"
Anonymous Coward Member since:
2005-07-06

Don't know where I'm going. I'm getting fed up with the linux world, with Fedora being too much experimental for everyday use, OpenSUSE being more bloated than Windows and more silly about drivers than Debian, Mandriva being unable to switch to the standard-compliant Network manager since so many years.


Have you given CentOS a whirl?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Democracy
by Neolander on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 12:58 in reply to "RE: Democracy"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Have you given CentOS a whirl?


Not yet, gonna try.

So? Fedora is meant to be bleeding edge.

Sure, but it does not make it a better distro for my use ;)

[q]How is that? openSUSE ships on single CDs (one with KDE SC and one with GNOME) with pretty much the same software collection as Ubuntu/Kubuntu etc.
The only major difference is slightly different software versions shipped because of openSUSE's longer testing period (2 months extra).


Don't know how they manage to do that. It boots up slowly, and using YaST is extremely slow, even for simple tasks

Huh? Why?


Just still angry about them removing madwifi from the liveCD when ath5k was still alpha-grade software that couldn't even connect to a network. Network drivers should be available right avay, how are we supposed to get them otherwise ? (Except by carrying around outdated RPMs)

Which standards does Mandriva not support?


Network manager. They keep using their ugly network configuration interface where you have to go through several layers of menus and obscure windows in order to connect to a Wi-fi network.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Democracy
by Fettarme H-Milch on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 11:04 in reply to "Democracy"
Fettarme H-Milch Member since:
2010-02-16

I'm getting fed up with the linux world, with Fedora being too much experimental for everyday use

So? Fedora is meant to be bleeding edge.

OpenSUSE being more bloated than Windows

How is that? openSUSE ships on single CDs (one with KDE SC and one with GNOME) with pretty much the same software collection as Ubuntu/Kubuntu etc.
The only major difference is slightly different software versions shipped because of openSUSE's longer testing period (2 months extra).

and more silly about drivers than Debian

Huh? Why?

Mandriva being unable to switch to the standard-compliant Network manager since so many years.

Which standards does Mandriva not support?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Democracy
by AdamW on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 15:53 in reply to "Democracy"
AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

"Mandriva being unable to switch to the standard-compliant Network manager since so many years."

Erm. What 'standards' are you talking about?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Democracy - network-manager
by jabbotts on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 17:20 in reply to "RE: Democracy"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

After years of Mandriva use, I must say that network-manager plus network-manager-kde (or network-manager-gnome) is a very nice replacement for Mandriva's tool.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Democracy
by Neolander on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 18:02 in reply to "RE: Democracy"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

"Mandriva being unable to switch to the standard-compliant Network manager since so many years."

Erm. What 'standards' are you talking about?

It's supported by freedesktop, the closest thing to standards for anything that's GUI-related on linux. And last time I used Mandriva (2009 or 2009 spring I think), the default Mandriva One install still included some horribly impractical software in place of it.

(If I remember well, to connect to a wifi network, you must
-Right-click on the tray icon
-Click on some wireless-related menu item
-Wait until a window displays
-Wait for a refresh
-Click on the network you want to connect to
-Click "connect"
-Enter your user password
-Wait for a new window to show up
-Choose the right encryption method, type in your wi-fi password
-Wait until the network connects
-Close the first window that's still around
-Browse the web

On NM, you...
-Click on the tray icon
-Select your network menu
-Type in your wifi password
-Wait until the network connects
-Browse the web

The last one is sure inspired by the Mac (and does even better since ethernet is available at the same place), but it works so much better...)

Edited 2010-03-22 18:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1