Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 18th Mar 2010 23:21 UTC
Legal Finally - after a few weeks, HTC has actually officially issued a statement regarding the patent infringement lawsuit Apple has thrown towards the Taiwanese phone maker. As you probably already anticipated, HTC states it will fully defend itself against Apple. It's on, it's on.
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RE[8]: OK, supose Apple wins
by lemur2 on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 10:01 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: OK, supose Apple wins"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

"
My example was for an aircraft design which was in fact of European origin. The non-European customers got to assemble most of the fleet in their own country. They chose it because the Americans are unbelieveably precious about their alleged IP, and that attitude flies in the face of the sovreignity of other nations.

As the Americans steadily become more and more precious about alleged IP, this type of thing will happen more and more often.
Could it be Saab 37 Viggen? And there are plenty of license built American planes in Europa like the F-16 for the original NATO partners where assembled in the Netherlands, most of Finlands F-18 are assembled in Finland to name a few examples.

Now days the customer are pretty strong, do to harder competition on the market and they demand more tech transfers and that majority of the fleet is assembled locally.
"

I'm not going to say, other than that the aircraft design was distinctly European, with no US-made components (especially software). The OEM had to go to an alternate source for a couple of replacement parts (such as the GPS I believe) in order to meet the customer's no-US-components requirement.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: OK, supose Apple wins
by ssa2204 on Mon 22nd Mar 2010 17:45 in reply to "RE[8]: OK, supose Apple wins"
ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22


I'm not going to say, other than that the aircraft design was distinctly European, with no US-made components (especially software). The OEM had to go to an alternate source for a couple of replacement parts (such as the GPS I believe) in order to meet the customer's no-US-components requirement.


In other words your blowing smoke out your ass as usual, no surprise there. I get the feeling that in this case what you are thinking about has nothing to do with "patents" in the first place, but I guess never let facts get in the way of your ideology right?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: OK, supose Apple wins
by lemur2 on Tue 23rd Mar 2010 02:53 in reply to "RE[9]: OK, supose Apple wins"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

" I'm not going to say, other than that the aircraft design was distinctly European, with no US-made components (especially software). The OEM had to go to an alternate source for a couple of replacement parts (such as the GPS I believe) in order to meet the customer's no-US-components requirement.
In other words your blowing smoke out your ass as usual, no surprise there. I get the feeling that in this case what you are thinking about has nothing to do with "patents" in the first place, but I guess never let facts get in the way of your ideology right? "

How did you arrive at that conclusion? What is so ublieveable about it? There are a number of capable nations who want no dealings with the US, or at least as few as possible. Some of them are capable enough to have their own nuclear devices.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_powers

This is an issue of sovreignity, more than a pure IP issue. Some nations hold no truck with the idea of the US "owning" any so-claimed "Intellectual Property". This applies particularly where the "Intellectual Property" in question is critical to a nation's independence. We are not talking about Hollywood movies here.

Edited 2010-03-23 03:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2