Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 23rd Mar 2010 23:57 UTC
Internet Explorer "At last year's PDC, held in November, Microsoft showed a graph showing scores of a variety of Web browsers in the SunSpider JavaScript benchmark, to show off the progress that the company was making with Internet Explorer 9. Another such graph was shown off at the recent MIX event. What was most interesting about the graph was not IE9's progress, but Opera's."
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RE[3]: Wrong question.
by lemur2 on Wed 24th Mar 2010 13:36 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Wrong question."
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

This is why they keep pushing their own technologies like Silverlight. Sure Silverlight is cross platform (now)


Your post was for the most part spot on, but for this bit.

Silverlight is not cross-platform. There are all kinds of caveats on Silverlight and .NET that amount to "you may not do that part on non-Windows platforms". ASP.NET, ADO.NET and Windows forms, for example. There are many platforms (ARM for example) that are not supported.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Wrong question.
by Laurence on Wed 24th Mar 2010 15:07 in reply to "RE[3]: Wrong question."
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Can Silverlight play on multiple platforms then?

I've avoided the technology (for the reasons stated in my previous post) so I will admit I'm a touch ignorant in regards to it's multi-platform capabilities, but I was under the impression Microsoft released a Linux and OS X Silverlight player?

Or are you stating that Silverlight is a bit like OOXML - in theory it can run on any platform but in practice there's references to Microsoft-only technology that limited the products functionality on non-MS products.

Edited 2010-03-24 15:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Wrong question.
by anda_skoa on Wed 24th Mar 2010 20:19 in reply to "RE[4]: Wrong question."
anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

Can Silverlight play on multiple platforms then?

Depends on one's definition of "play" and "multiple platforms"

I've avoided the technology (for the reasons stated in my previous post) so I will admit I'm a touch ignorant in regards to it's multi-platform capabilities, but I was under the impression Microsoft released a Linux and OS X Silverlight player?

No, only for Windows and OS X, the the latter one is more limited, e.g. "PlayReady" (streaming of media from paranoid producers) is only available on Windows desktops.

Or are you stating that Silverlight is a bit like OOXML - in theory it can run on any platform but in practice there's references to Microsoft-only technology that limited the products functionality on non-MS products.


Exactly, though that should not come as a surprise.

There are free software implementations of some portions of Silverlight though, which can naturally be used on a much wider range of platforms.
But of course also more limited than the already limited OS X offering.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Wrong question.
by nt_jerkface on Wed 24th Mar 2010 20:13 in reply to "RE[3]: Wrong question."
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Silverlight is not cross-platform.


It is cross-platform. It works across multiple platforms.

Maybe it isn't cross-platform enough for you, but that is a separate issue.

Silverlight is great competitor to Flash as seen by Bing maps.
http://www.bing.com/maps/explore/

You also have to remember that Silverlight is not just about what it can do, it's also about the framework. It allows .net developers to quickly adapt to web development. You can't expect those developers to switch to some HTML5 javascript implementation for the sake of your own ideals. The same goes for developers who are experts in Flex.

You should probably also save your advocacy energy for when HTML5 is ready to compete with Flash and Silverlight. It simply isn't ready yet.

Until then you can amuse yourself with these Flash games:
http://www.addictinggames.com/index.html

Reply Parent Score: 2