Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 25th Mar 2010 11:55 UTC
Multimedia, AV And so the H264/Theora debate concerning HTML5 video continues. The most recent entry into the discussion comes from John Gruber, who argues that Theora is more in danger of patent litigation than H264. He's wrong, and here's why.
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RE[2]: but...
by darwinOS on Thu 25th Mar 2010 13:18 UTC in reply to "RE: but..."
darwinOS
Member since:
2009-11-02

If google really believes that supporting Theora is minimal threat, why don't they Use it on YOUTUBE? why did they invested in buying a new Codecs? Google is like a whore if you pay them (with supporting Theora, they get the OSS- Supporters heart), they gonna do what ever you want! They do any thing to get more users and Ads market.
Only the future will tell, I don't believe that Mozilla will keep their Position, Google is taking their Market-space. Buy supporting both Codecs they are getting Firefox-users, but they will not use Theora in any Productive Space.

my two cents

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: but...
by lemur2 on Thu 25th Mar 2010 13:35 in reply to "RE[2]: but..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

If google really believes that supporting Theora is minimal threat, why don't they Use it on YOUTUBE? why did they invested in buying a new Codecs? Google is like a whore if you pay them (with supporting Theora, they get the OSS- Supporters heart), they gonna do what ever you want! They do any thing to get more users and Ads market.
Only the future will tell, I don't believe that Mozilla will keep their Position, Google is taking their Market-space. Buy supporting both Codecs they are getting Firefox-users, but they will not use Theora in any Productive Space.

my two cents


As long as MPEG LA do not control the market completely, MPEG LA need YouTube to be h.264. MPEG LA might even SPONSOR YouTube to use h.264 ... that is a possibility.

Eraly last year, MPEG LA were starting to get very confident of their position. There was no other competitive codec. Mozilla announced a donation to improve Theora, but pfffft ... that wasn't a threat (or so thought MPEG LA).

http://techcrunch.com/2009/01/26/mozilla-gives-100000-grant-towards...

Early last year, MPEG LA began talking about increases in the license fees for h.264 for use on the web. Google saw the writing on the wall, and bought On2 (about mid-year), hoping to gain an alternative codec from that.

Unfortunately, On2 are licensees of MPEG LA.

http://www.mpegla.com/main/programs/AVC/Pages/Licensees.aspx
(number 465).

Late last year (well after Google had bought On2), Mozilla's funding of Xiph.org for development of Theora bore fruit. Xiph.org released the Thusnelda branch of Theora, which finally was competitive with h.264.

As a side-note, development of Theora continues, and the next branch (called ptalarbvorm, which is now still experimental) is an appreciable improvement over Thusnelda (and hence, an improvement over h.264).

http://people.xiph.org/~greg/video/ptalarbvorm/

Thusnelda and Ptalarbvorm both make perfect sense for Google to use "in production space". The earlier Theora 1.0, which was out when Google bought On2, was not suitable.

Edited 2010-03-25 13:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4