Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 31st Mar 2010 22:10 UTC, submitted by aaronb
Gnome The GNOME team has released version 2.30 of their open source desktop environment. "The GNOME Project's focus on users and usability continues in GNOME 2.30 with its hundreds of bug fixes and user-requested improvements. The sheer number of enhancements makes it impossible to list every change and improvement made."
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RE: Changelog?
by kiddo on Thu 1st Apr 2010 02:13 UTC in reply to "Changelog?"
kiddo
Member since:
2005-07-23

Do you expect them to revert to just dumping raw ChangeLog files with hundreds of changes *per project/component* onto users, instead of having a nicely formatted summary that just highlights the most visible changes they are susceptible to care about?

OpenOffice.org comes to mind as a textbook example of what not to do. Compare GNOME's release notes with http://development.openoffice.org/releases/3.2.0.html#new for example.

Their "we have hundreds of changes, we can't list everything" catchphrase may sound silly to some of you, but 1) it is entirely truthful 2) it is good marketing.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Changelog?
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 1st Apr 2010 04:32 in reply to "RE: Changelog?"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

But is it useful to anyone actually interested in the changes?

I prefer PHP's change log. The announcement summarises the big important changes most people will be interested in. But the actual change log, lists all of the actual changes. Sometimes with some of these projects you find a bug, fix it yourself or someone else submits a patch, see it accepted ( or rejected ;) ) into the trunk, but never hear what release it makes it into so you can stop manually patching the source.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Changelog?
by spiderman on Thu 1st Apr 2010 09:21 in reply to "RE[2]: Changelog?"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23


I prefer PHP's change log. The announcement summarises the big important changes most people will be interested in. But the actual change log, lists all of the actual changes. Sometimes with some of these projects you find a bug, fix it yourself or someone else submits a patch, see it accepted ( or rejected ;) ) into the trunk, but never hear what release it makes it into so you can stop manually patching the source.

Can't you use git for that?

Reply Parent Score: 3