Linked by kloty on Tue 6th Apr 2010 21:22 UTC
Editorial A few years ago I wrote on OSNews several articles (1,2) about workstations. After three years I had to stop, because there were no workstations left on the market, they became legacy and were not sold any more. Now with the rise of mobile devices with touchscreen and wireless network connectivity virtually everywhere, the question becomes valid, what will happen with the desktop computers, are they still needed, or will they follow the workstations on their way to computer museums?
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Comment by ssa2204
by ssa2204 on Tue 6th Apr 2010 22:43 UTC
ssa2204
Member since:
2006-04-22

Sure the PC will be dead, the day they figure out how to:
1.) Connect your little toy device to a screen that is actually readable
2.) Provide the storage capacity to rival what a desktop could theoretically have.
3.) Provide processing power to rival that of a desktop
4.) Of course provide a means of input, and now the little on screen keyboards just do not cut it.

Get the point? No, the desktop will be with us for years to come. Of course innovation and advancement will occur. When the future cell phone has a 5Ghz quad core CPU, while impressive, let's not forget that the what the desktop will have!

Edited 2010-04-06 22:43 UTC

Reply Score: 6

Cromat Member since:
2009-12-15

I am a developer, I will never give up my desktop with 3 monitors, working on a laptop with at most one extra monitor is not enough anymore!

Further more I don't buy into this corporate bs that we need devices like the iPad or iPhone, these apps are only for entertaining, do people like to accomplish anything anymore, or are we so consumed with shiny entertainment devices that we forget how these devices and the software are created....On real workstations.

Reply Parent Score: 2

cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

No, sales charts say that people are buying more mobile devices. We're buying mobile devices that can somewhat compete with the desktop PCs because we don't have them already. Meanwhile, most people who have uses for desktops got them. Broadband getting more common is getting people to buy desktop PCs who haven't before, but not at any great rate. The desktop is pretty much at saturation level.

I don't know anyone who has a notebook replacing their desktop, and statistics haven't shown that to be wrong. Fitting with the statistics, I know tons of people who have been getting notebooks and smartphones, in addition to their desktop computers, or in lieu of them for specific cases (like going to college and living in a dorm, where space is a premium).

The desktop will die, and be fully replaced by other things, but we are still a good ways away from it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by ssa2204
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Wed 7th Apr 2010 08:07 in reply to "Comment by ssa2204"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Sure the PC will be dead, the day they figure out how to:
1.) Connect your little toy device to a screen that is actually readable


HDMI Port

2.) Provide the storage capacity to rival what a desktop could theoretically have.

How much space do you need? Most people's music collection fits on a 30 gig ipod. ID estimate that they'd need close to 150 gb for movie collection. So once they hit 200 gb of storage, it will be close.

3.) Provide processing power to rival that of a desktop

For what? A desktop of what era? today's? Yesterday's ? tomorrow's? Its a moving target describing what? People want to do things other than add integers and floating points. That's what matters. The nexus is more powerful than the computer I had four years ago.

4.) Of course provide a means of input, and now the little on screen keyboards just do not cut it.


You mean a doc? like the Ipad keyboard doc?


Get the point? No, the desktop will be with us for years to come. Of course innovation and advancement will occur. When the future cell phone has a 5Ghz quad core CPU, while impressive, let's not forget that the what the desktop will have!


I think you've done a good job convincing me that the article isn't that far off. I don't care what form the desktop takes. Just that it has the features you listed above. Plus maybe hardware upgrades. No crappy non serviceable battery.

Edit: But maybe I could be persuaded to give up hardware upgrades if the price was right.

Edited 2010-04-07 08:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by ssa2204
by Kroc on Wed 7th Apr 2010 08:55 in reply to "RE: Comment by ssa2204"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

But maybe I could be persuaded to give up hardware upgrades if the price was right.

Convienience. I used to build and maintain my own computer for ages, and eventually I grew tired of that. Upgrading is great and all, but at the end of the day you want to save space, you want to declutter and you want to spend more time being productive than forever maintaining your computer. I went from hand building a desktop cheaply to an expensive Mac laptop and haven’t looked back.

The desktop will eventually be the domain of the engineer and the “fetishist hardcore gamer”. The rest of us will have moved on to a less stressful, less complicated computing experience.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by ssa2204
by cerbie on Sun 11th Apr 2010 07:07 in reply to "RE: Comment by ssa2204"
cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

HDMI plugging into...what? This DVI port here? That DVI port there?

Until one of the other new ports finally, "wins," I'm sticking with DVI, which is on all my current hardware, and likely to be on any future hardware,

200GB doesn't even cover CDs (hyperbole: it's about 230GB, right now). I'm not average, and I'm OK with that.

Processing power I agree with. Drivers are a far more important issue (and the reason we don't have good ARM devices around). I have all the processing power I need in a PC that's a few years old, and we're still getting faster and adding more of those still-faster cores.

I think you will give up hardware upgrades. Based on what AMD is doing just next year w/ LLano, once we can get high-speed RAM (like DDR5) into PCs, the equivalent of $100 video cards today will not be needed (just as non-Intel IGP has replaced the need for a card to have a decent display and decent 2D GUI performance). Then, you'd need to plug in storage and RAM, with maybe one or two internal PCI-e slots.

Add another decade, and those slots go away. It's a box with plenty of peripheral I/O options, that might have upgradable memory. Think Mac Mini, but w/o Apple's minimalism.

Eventually, a PC at a place where you sit down will not be about hardware features so much as being able to sit there, with a mouse, keyboard, big display, and big storage (NAS for everyone is like thin clients--neat sometimes, but it doesn't work out so well for most people in the long run).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by ssa2204
by leech on Sat 10th Apr 2010 02:09 in reply to "Comment by ssa2204"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

I have a Nokia N900, and could almost replace my computer with it. I can connect it to a TV for a larger screen, use Bluetooth keyboard and mouse, and it currently has 48gb of total space.

With Easy Debian installed, I have access to pretty much all of Debian Lenny.

Really the only thing that would be missing is a DVD burner, I don't think they make a bluetooth one.

But seriously though, why would I want to do that? Just think if your phone/pda/iPad/whatever was stolen and all your work taken?

Reply Parent Score: 2