Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 8th Apr 2010 18:24 UTC
Apple Today, Apple held a special press event at its campus in Cupertino during which it revealed and demonstrated the new features that are going into the fourth version of the iPhone operating system. The company focussed on 7 'tentpole' features, the most prominent of which is... Multitasking.
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RE: HowTo: Killing Adobe Flash
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 8th Apr 2010 18:56 UTC in reply to "HowTo: Killing Adobe Flash"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

Make it the dominant ad platform on the dominant mobile platform


Boom, roadblock. Mobile internet is still minute compared to the real deal. Very small market. For now, at least.

Reply Parent Score: 2

pgeorgi Member since:
2010-02-18

It's the one market with people willing to and capable of spending money, and the one market where ad-blockers won't come to the user's rescue.

That might be good enough for it to become a small, but "reasonably" priced market to advertise on.

Reply Parent Score: 1

JonathanBThompson Member since:
2006-05-26

If you kept up with live blogging on one of the other sites and you were paying attention, iAd addresses the reality that for the mobile realm, it's in-app ads that have the command, and search is pretty much nothing for the total amount of time users are potentially exposed: search just isn't where it's at for mobile devices and advertising revenue! 100 million devices with an average of 30 minutes of app use a day, with an ad every 3 minutes== 1 billion ads served on iPhoneOS devices, EACH DAY. That's nothing to sneeze at, and, chances are, most people on a mobile device aren't browsing the web enough and doing searches for that to be the majority of their possible ad exposure.

Reply Parent Score: 2

CaptainN- Member since:
2005-07-07

Second roadblock. Desktop ads still have to support older versions of IE - this means no HTML5 (at least until IE9 is the new dominant standard - in 8 years).

HTML5 is truly magnificent, and I can wait to start using it. By the time we can ditch legacy IE compatibility, Flash will have newer features that we've all come to rely on (if Adobe keeps innovating - and I have to be honest, Adobe has slowed that horse, compared with how fast Macromedia used to roll out new useful features), and HTML5 will be behind again.

Hopefully Adobe knows the value of Flash is less the player, and more the production tools - I make things in Flash because it's faster, easier, and cheaper. With an HTML5 publish target, I'd be happy to continue using their tools - and frankly, HTML5 has no tools support right now (except arguably Dreamweaver, which is actually an HTML4 tool, and it also put out by Adobe).

Reply Parent Score: 3

FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

By the time we can ditch legacy IE compatibility, Flash will have newer features that we've all come to rely on


This is true.

Adobe can just add things to Flash and its done. It takes an act of congress to add stuff to HTML.

Adobe added peer to peer and chatroulette appeared out of nowhere. Now just think how long it would take for HTML5 to add peer to peer, audio input, and video input. Now think how long it would take for someone to implement a working version of something chatroulette-like. It would probably take something like that team of google employed experts that got Quake running on HTML5. Not saying its un-doable; just saying making applications in HTML5 seems very very hacky.

Reply Parent Score: 3

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

For now, at least.


Thats the thing, it is a space that is growing exponentially right now. Mobile video platforms are probably right up there with selling virtual goods in social games as business models that are pretty much guaranteed to get you funding at the moment.

Reply Parent Score: 2