Linked by Kroc Camen on Fri 9th Apr 2010 10:29 UTC
Linux "To be clear about this article's intent, it's not to bash Microsoft, or Windows. Because to be fair, despite using Linux 95% of the time while I'm on the PC, I can find more faults with it than Windows. So, this article's goal is to highlight some of the major pluses of Linux, and also showcase where Windows could improve in the future, should Microsoft take heed of the suggestions."
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RE: Comment by tuma324
by vivainio on Fri 9th Apr 2010 12:26 UTC in reply to "Comment by tuma324"
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26


What are these things that Windows can do better than Linux?


- Work with projectors.
- Audio. Linux audio is currently more broken than ever
- Gaming

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by tuma324
by lemur2 on Fri 9th Apr 2010 12:40 in reply to "RE: Comment by tuma324"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"
What are these things that Windows can do better than Linux?


- Work with projectors.
"

RandR works just fine.

- Audio. Linux audio is currently more broken than ever


Nope. Works beautifully out of the box (KDE). Can't say the same for Windows (you will often have to find a 3rd party driver for your audio).

- Gaming


Fair enough.

I'll see your "gaming" and raise you "formats supported", "interoperability" and "cross-platform support".

Edited 2010-04-09 12:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by tuma324
by Laurence on Fri 9th Apr 2010 13:24 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by tuma324"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

[AUDIO]
Nope. Works beautifully out of the box (KDE). Can't say the same for Windows (you will often have to find a 3rd party driver for your audio).


As a DJ and producer, Linux audio is rubbish compared to Windows.

Sure, for basic desktop uses, Linux audio is mostly ok. But move into the professional spaces and it's a complete mess.

For example: It's taken me longer to get one external sound processing unit recognised as the primary sound card in OSS than installing an entire XP system from scratch including studio apps such as Soundforge, Ableton, FL Studio, and more than a dozen VST(i)s.
And that was /JUST/ setting up /ONE/ device in OSS. It still doesn't work in ALSA et al. I still haven't got Jack working either.

So as much as I love Linux and use it as my primary desktop, I'm not going to waste my entire time setting up a Linux studio workstation when I should be writing music on it. For me, Linux audio isn't even at Windows 2000's level - and that's just unacceptable.

The worst thing is, it's not even as if Linux couldn't work as a functional professional audio workstation. If FSF/GNU/whoever just sat down and agreed a concise standard and then spent some time giving it a little love, they could bring Linux audio into the 21st century with in no time (comparatively speaking). But as always, there's too many cooks in the kitchen and nobody serving the food (excuse the analogy).

Edited 2010-04-09 13:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by tuma324
by aesiamun on Fri 9th Apr 2010 18:39 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by tuma324"
aesiamun Member since:
2005-06-29

I have some really obscure sound hardware and windows 7 found it out of the box. typical that linux users use XP or earlier problems as problems with windows...when really those problems are in the past.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by tuma324
by sorpigal on Fri 9th Apr 2010 13:00 in reply to "RE: Comment by tuma324"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

- Audio. Linux audio is currently more broken than ever


This is both true and not true. At the moment things are *so close* to being perfect that I can smell the finish line, if I may mix my metaphors.

If distributions would set up everything to just use jack by default then 90% of everything would work correctly automatically. The other 10% is mostly the same 10% that fails to work with PulseAudio, too.

Perfection is on its way. I am not a PA fan but I understand that it has some advantages that users apparently want. As such my proposed ideal audio stack in Linux is

PulseAudio -> Jack -> ALSA

And stack everything else on top as PA recommends. Each application targets jack if it can, PA if it must, or a higher level library (e.g. libao). Anything targeting ALSA gets routed through jack for mixing.

This gives you a stack that is flexible and friendly. The only issues are PA being a resource hog, jack stability and the unfriendly fact that they both require everything to be run as the same user. All three of these problems have solutions that will arrive sooner or later. Meanwhile audio *does* work, it just has to be configured with care. This makes it like any number of issues Linux has had in the past--from X to wireless networking--which have gradually gone from horrid to Just Works.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by tuma324
by rhavenn on Fri 9th Apr 2010 17:18 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by tuma324"
rhavenn Member since:
2006-05-12

PulseAudio is a step backwards. It's a sound server just like ESD and aRTS were. It's solving problems that should be solved at the driver level and because ALSA either can't or refuses to "fix" their stuff the Linux guys just coded around it. DO a search in news groups for how much people hated aRTS or ESD and I don't see how PA is any different. The network sound stuff is cool, but the rest of the "features" it has should be in the driver or hardware level. For example, the FreeBSD OSS drivers just create virtual sound channels so my apps all share the same sound card without issue. I install Linux (Gentoo or Debian) and whammo, suddenly I can only use one sound source and when I'm streaming radio the sound channel is locked. Under FreeBSD I can stream audio, boot up Windows 7 inside VirtualBOX and play a Flash video there and then open Xine and play a video. Sure, the audio is "garbled", but all 3 play without issue.

The audio "problem" should be fixed with ALSA at the device level and not with some software hack or drop ALSA and go back to OSS. FreeBSD did it right. Linux slapped some patches together and then went on to the next "shiny object" without bothering to polish and refine the original.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by tuma324
by SlackerJack on Fri 9th Apr 2010 13:14 in reply to "RE: Comment by tuma324"
SlackerJack Member since:
2005-11-12

I'm pretty sure if you install a five year old distro, you'll revoke that point about sound in Linux. I've never seen the sound preferences UI look so good and work so well and to me it looks very comparable to the one in Windows 7..

Gaming? Well, Until a Linux distro gets big market share then you cannot compare, since game developers will always make games for the most used system or the most profitable one. Most game developers seem to primary develop for consoles now days and gaming on Windows is at an all time low thanks to pirating.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by tuma324
by vivainio on Fri 9th Apr 2010 13:31 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by tuma324"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

I'm pretty sure if you install a five year old distro, you'll revoke that point about sound in Linux.


5 year ago we had Warty and Hoary. Audio worked like a charm with Alsa.

Pulseaudio should work just fine as long as everyone buys into it (yes, this includes KDE). In windows, fighting over audio subsystem (not everyone likes pa) is unnecessary because there is just one.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by tuma324
by Fergy on Fri 9th Apr 2010 15:26 in reply to "RE: Comment by tuma324"
Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

- Work with projectors.
- Audio. Linux audio is currently more broken than ever
- Gaming


- Firefox is much faster on win7 64bit than ubuntu10.04 64bit.
- win7 has 1 homegroup password to enable sharing files easily

Edited 2010-04-09 15:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Understand the last two, but what do you mean by working with projectors? Its just another screen right?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by tuma324
by vivainio on Fri 9th Apr 2010 17:41 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by tuma324"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Understand the last two, but what do you mean by working with projectors? Its just another screen right?


Just a personal thing - I made an ass out of myself recently because Karmic didn't recognize the resolutions supported by the projector, forcing 640x480 maximum and ruining my presentation.

(nvidia binary blob on Dell Precision M 2400 - "nv" driver wouldn't have seen the projector at all).

Those surprising moments are the ones when you wish you could your daily work on windows or mac; that's probably why people that do lots of presentations usually have one of the lesser operating systems, even if they would otherwise have the heart & skills to operate completely in the Linux domain.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by tuma324
by boldingd on Mon 12th Apr 2010 19:39 in reply to "RE: Comment by tuma324"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

I can't really argue with that. That's why I dual-boot. ;)

For TF2, there's Windows; fore everything else, there's Slackware.

Reply Parent Score: 2