Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 9th Apr 2010 22:42 UTC
Google This, people, is a big one. Remember all the articles we had on Theora, H264, and which codec is better suited for HTML5 video? Well, it seems that Google has officially decided to put some serious weight behind... Theora. What they're doing is a baby step, but one specific aspect of that baby step is very important: Google is openly stating that Theora is free of patents.
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runjorel
Member since:
2009-02-09

Ok it wasn't too long when we saw this article: "Google To Bundle Flash with Chrome" http://www.osnews.com/story/23081/Google_To_Bundle_Flash_with_Chrom....

So....I don't get it. What's going on? Feel free to tell me I'm an idiot and that these things aren't related.

Edit: I know that they are supporting and flash for desktop theora for mobile, but still. It's weird.

Edited 2010-04-10 00:31 UTC

Reply Score: 1

ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

I think "Google To Bundle Flash With Chrome" is Google's answer to the Mozilla team's plan to have Firefox monitor plugin versions and auto-disable ones with known vulnerabilities.

(Google's big on the whole "silently install updates" thing. Bundling Flash allows them to ensure that security updates get installed as soon as they're available)

Edited 2010-04-10 00:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Ok it wasn't too long when we saw this article: "Google To Bundle Flash with Chrome" http://www.osnews.com/story/23081/Google_To_Bundle_Flash_with_Chrom....

So....I don't get it. What's going on? Feel free to tell me I'm an idiot and that these things aren't related.


Actually, they probably aren't. Google are just covering all bases, and I doubt they're supporting and funding Theora's development for altruistic reasons. They're bundling Flash now to make a seemless experience for Chrome users. They're funding Theora most likely because, of late, Apple and Google have been moving more to compete directly with each other in just about everything. Given Apple's investment behind MPEG-LA and H.264, it makes sense for Google not to put themselves in a position where they'd be dependent on Apple and required to pay Apple (even if via the MPEG-LA) for use of H.264. Therefore, they set up a competing solution and Theora is the obvious choice given its openness. Google position themselves against Apple, make themselves look like the good guys (and in this case they actually are), and get a solution that in the long run is more likely to be adopted by the majority of web video who cannot pay the H.264 licensing costs. It's a win for Google and, in this case, a win for the open web as well.

Reply Parent Score: 6

runjorel Member since:
2009-02-09

Ahh good call.

Reply Parent Score: 1

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Google position themselves against Apple, make themselves look like the good guys (and in this case they actually are), and get a solution that in the long run is more likely to be adopted by the majority of web video who cannot pay the H.264 licensing costs. It's a win for Google and, in this case, a win for the open web as well.


No Google is just deceiving people like you into thinking that they are for an open web when nothing has prevented them from pushing Theora adoption through YouTube. Google and Apple are the ones that were pushing h.264 at the W3C in the first place.

Reply Parent Score: 2

nicolasgoddone Member since:
2009-04-20

Yup, thinking pretty much the same here, shifting weights around is what balance is all about, I (for the most part) welcome our theora-wellcoming overlord ;) !

Reply Parent Score: 1