Linked by Kroc Camen on Tue 13th Apr 2010 11:35 UTC
Podcasts We are joined by OSnews user Mark Henderson to discuss iPhone OS 4 and Apple's licence restrictions on third-party development tools. Also discussed is Haiku, QNX, WebKit 2, Theora and Copyright. Please note that the show was recorded before we received news about Palm.
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RE[3]: gramma police
by Christian Paratschek on Tue 13th Apr 2010 15:07 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: gramma police"
Christian Paratschek
Member since:
2005-07-06

I have
thou hast
he/she/it hath

Funny, how close old english and modern german are. The same in German would be:

ich habe
du hast
er/sie/es hat

And from then english only got simpler and german stayed bloody complicated - for no reason :-)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: gramma police
by loftyhauser on Tue 13th Apr 2010 15:17 in reply to "RE[3]: gramma police"
loftyhauser Member since:
2006-12-18

Funny, how close old english and modern german are.



For a reason -- they are both germanic languages!

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: gramma police
by cb88 on Tue 13th Apr 2010 17:08 in reply to "RE[3]: gramma police"
cb88 Member since:
2009-04-23

What? most English words do not follow a regular spelling is German even worse?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: gramma police
by darknexus on Wed 14th Apr 2010 00:04 in reply to "RE[4]: gramma police"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

What? most English words do not follow a regular spelling is German even worse?


Nope, not in spelling anyway. German is pretty regular, words are usually spelled how they sound although there are a few letter combinations that sound identical so you have to know which one to use (ai and ei, ie and ih, etc). German grammar is quite a bit more complex than modern English however and retains a lot of older constructions that English has since done away with (word genders, noun and adjective inflections, etc). English grammar is actually quite simple, it's the spelling irregularities that make it one of the most difficult languages for many to learn.
Also, to quibble: Thou shalt is *not* Old English, but rather very late Middle English. Old English is much closer to Old German (and even Modern German) than to anything we call English these days. What we now call Old English is the root from which sprang both English and German as we know them. Most English-speaking people would not recognize true Old English at all, and mistakenly refer to the language of three or four centuries ago as Old English.

Reply Parent Score: 2