Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 15th Apr 2010 18:48 UTC
Legal Another article on intellectual property enforcement? Yes, since I consider this to be the most important struggle technology has to face over the coming decade. We already know that content providers don't care one bit about hard-fought concepts like freedom and privacy, but the joint proposals by the RIAA and MPAA to the US Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator really blew my brains out: monitoring software installed on people's computers, border inspections - it's all there, and then some.
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RE[2]: Those guys....
by Cody Evans on Fri 16th Apr 2010 01:36 UTC in reply to "RE: Those guys...."
Cody Evans
Member since:
2009-08-14

The way they get it on computers is actually very simple. They make the monitoring spyware for Windows and Mac products, and make it a requirement for accessing the internet.

The big ISP's in the US also being content companies, would gladly go along. Other OS's would just be written off as a cost of "progress".

This is the same plan they have for implementing trusted computing as well.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Those guys....
by darknexus on Fri 16th Apr 2010 01:40 in reply to "RE[2]: Those guys...."
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I'd think that could be faked relatively easily though all things considered.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Those guys....
by bhtooefr on Fri 16th Apr 2010 02:50 in reply to "RE[3]: Those guys...."
bhtooefr Member since:
2009-02-19

Although, the TC hardware would have to be broken, and isn't it moving into chipsets?

Then again, there's always setting up a new network to replace the Internet. Various technologies... 802.11 mesh (scaling issues, extremely obvious RF traffic,) free space optical (hard to add new users, extremely visually obvious,) sneakernet (horrendous latency, but excellent bandwidth, and with how small USB flash drives and microSD cards are, extremely undetectable,) dial-up (slow, detectable, but lowish latency,) etc., etc.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Those guys....
by lemur2 on Fri 16th Apr 2010 03:05 in reply to "RE[2]: Those guys...."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

The way they get it on computers is actually very simple. They make the monitoring spyware for Windows and Mac products, and make it a requirement for accessing the internet. The big ISP's in the US also being content companies, would gladly go along. Other OS's would just be written off as a cost of "progress". This is the same plan they have for implementing trusted computing as well.


Not only do I run Linux, but so does my ISP. There are no "Windows or Mac" machines in sight in this picture.

Neither the MPAA nor the RIAA has any jurisdiction at all over my ISP or over me.

http://gizmodo.com/5517850/riaampaa-want-government+mandated-spywar...

Here are some of the lovely things that they're calling for:

* spyware on your computer that detects and deletes infringing materials;


Sorry, but somehow that item just wasn't on my list to "sudo aptitude install" today.

Edited 2010-04-16 03:14 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3