Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 16th Apr 2010 09:39 UTC
Games I think we need to start a digital rights category or something (the next version of OSNews will have it, for sure), because we have yet another article about this subject. After Sony removed the Other OS feature from the PlayStation 3, a European PlayStation 3 owner successfully secured a partial refund from Amazon under the European Sale of Goods Act. Sony has now retaliated, stating it is not going to reimburse retailers.
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These "Contracts"
by Leroy on Fri 16th Apr 2010 12:05 UTC
Leroy
Member since:
2006-07-06

The thing I hate about purchasing any electronic device, is the EULA, warranties and manuals. I can't read any of them before purchasing the item. Most of these are not posted on the websites. Never mind that the item is mostly discontinued once it reaches the store shelf. And these EULAs with their "changing the terms of the contract" at the manufacturer's whim.

Sometimes I think I should just type up a EULA of my own and mail to the manufacturer. "I the user will according to my fancy, whim or ever changing mood, change the agreements and terms of the contract." Which is the original intent of the device.

Reply Score: 2

RE: These "Contracts"
by Drumhellar on Fri 16th Apr 2010 16:14 in reply to "These "Contracts""
Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

Well, manuals are almost universally available on the manufacturer's website.

In the US, retailers are required to make available all warranty information upon request.

The same isn't true for EULAs.
I think for software, consumers should be required to physically sign a EULA at the point of purchase.

This would do wonders eliminate them, or at the very least keep them sane.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: These "Contracts"
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 16th Apr 2010 16:31 in reply to "RE: These "Contracts""
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I think for software, consumers should be required to physically sign a EULA at the point of purchase.


Yup, I've been saying that for years. In addition, the main terms must be written in human-readable format, and not in legalese. This isn't rocket science.

Reply Parent Score: 1