Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 19th Apr 2010 13:10 UTC
Linux We all know Synaptics, the company that seems to produce just about every touchpad you can get your hands fingers on. Their touchpads also do a lot of multitouch and gesture stuff, but up until now, their set of gestures, the Synaptics Gesture Suite, was only available on Windows. Luckily, they've ported it over to Linux, and made it available for OEMs building Linux laptops.
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RE[3]: Comment by spinnekopje
by Laurence on Tue 20th Apr 2010 14:30 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by spinnekopje"
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

Having to spend a little bit of time downloading a few drivers is considerably different from having non-working or partially-working drivers that you have to tweak and play with to (hopefully) get your device to function at some percent of its Windows capacity.

But my point is Linux is already equivelent to Windows in most repects without having to download drivers.

but you're still missing the point that it's only a small percentage of hardware that require hacking about.



And by the way, I don't know about other vendors, but Lenovo has all the drivers available on a single page on their site. You download them all, run each one and your done. That's pretty easy.


That's good, aside the fact (and as I'd already explained) that you still have countless reboots between driver installs as you can't install everything in one job lot - thus significantly increasing installation time.



Don't get me wrong, I'm not out to say that Linux is better than Windows. I'm just stating that this myth about Linux not support hardware is just that, a myth. Sure, Linux isn't without it's hardware troubles, but then no OS supports all hardware (not even Windows) and the hardware Linux does support (which is the vast majority of available hardware) it generally supports without additional user downloads and pratting about.

I know personal experience is purely anecdotal, but I honestly think that over the years I've spent an equal amount of time setting up Windows systems with it's driver models as I have Linux systems with missing drivers. And that's without me going out of my way to buy "Linux compatible" hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by spinnekopje
by siride on Tue 20th Apr 2010 14:51 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by spinnekopje"
siride Member since:
2006-01-02

I'm sorry, you're still failing the see the fundamental and significant difference between having to download a few EXEs and install them, and having to tweak config files, apply patches, download experimental versions of software and potentially still not getting your hardware to work. If you can't see the difference, then no wonder Linux is failing on the desktop.

I'm sorry, downloading EXEs and installing them is not "hacking around".

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by spinnekopje
by Laurence on Tue 20th Apr 2010 15:03 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by spinnekopje"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I'm sorry, you're still failing the see the fundamental and significant difference between having to download a few EXEs and install them, and having to tweak config files, apply patches, download experimental versions of software and potentially still not getting your hardware to work. If you can't see the difference, then no wonder Linux is failing on the desktop.

I'm sorry, downloading EXEs and installing them is not "hacking around".


Right, I can see we're going round in circles now so I'm only going to say this one last time:

1/ I never stated that downloading an EXE in Windows is "hacking around".

2/ 4 out of 5 systems I build I don't have to tweak config files, run experimental versions of software or apply patches to get my hardware working. 99% of the time my hardware works 1st time in Linux. No mess, no nothing. 99% of the time Linux works "out of the box". 99% of the time, Linux "just works". 99% of the time I install the OS, reboot once, then I have a *FULLY* functional OS. ie 99% of the time your argument is WRONG.

I hope that clears up some confusion. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3