Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Apr 2010 20:24 UTC, submitted by Governa
Oracle and SUN When Oracle announced its intentions to buy Sun Microsystems, many were worried about the future of Sun's large open source software portfolio, which includes things like Solaris, Java, MySQL, and more. It seems like Oracle is still struggling with what to do with the large body of products Sun entails; they've started charging 90 USD per user for the Microsoft Office ODF plugin.
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iaefai
Member since:
2009-12-14

Ah, But! If they own the copyright on the code, or track down what isn't theirs and weed it out, then they can license it however they want.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Ah, But! If they own the copyright on the code, or track down what isn't theirs and weed it out, then they can license it however they want.


One can't "take back" code that has been released as GPL.

Oracle could release future extensions of OpenOffice as closed source, but since OpenOffice.org is already outstripped by other open source variants in terms of extensions, Oracle would then become an also-ran to that market with an unattractive offering.

Edited 2010-04-21 02:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

jokkel Member since:
2008-07-07

No you are wrong. If one releases a piece of software as GPL or other Open Source, the copyright remains with the original author. The author can at any time use sourcecode for that he owns the copyright for any purpose he likes. This includes releasing closed source versions.
That's also why some open source projects only accept code contributions, if the copyright is assigned to the entity that runs it. e.g. OpenOffice, MySQL and GNU.

To be clear: the code released as GPL will still be free. But the author can release his software with a license he chooses.

Edited 2010-04-21 09:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2