Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 21st Apr 2010 22:55 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y Recently, Apple changed its iPhone OS developer agreement to prohibit the use of programming language other than Objective-C, C, C++, and JavaScript running in WebKit. This has the effect of pretty much pre-emptively killing Adobe's CS5 iPhone developer tools, as well as several other, similar tools. Adobe has now said it will cease development of the iPhone development tools. To make matters really interesting, Apple has actually replied directly to this news.
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RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by Smeagol on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 02:16 UTC in reply to "Comment by mtzmtulivu"
Smeagol
Member since:
2006-01-16

Uh, wrong. It is an open standard.
http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-H.264/e

This doesn't mean there aren't patents & licensing associated with it. Open != free.

So, Apple is perfectly correct in making this statement and is not "lying".

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by lemur2 on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 02:22 in reply to "RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Uh, wrong. It is an open standard. http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-H.264/e This doesn't mean there aren't patents & licensing associated with it. Open != free. So, Apple is perfectly correct in making this statement and is not "lying".


"Published" != "Open".

"Open" = "Published specification, anyone may implement, no royalties apply, freely re-distributable".

H.264 is published, and it is a standard, but it is NOT an open standard.

Edited 2010-04-22 02:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by tyrione on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 04:08 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
tyrione Member since:
2005-11-21

"Uh, wrong. It is an open standard. http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-H.264/e This doesn't mean there aren't patents & licensing associated with it. Open != free. So, Apple is perfectly correct in making this statement and is not "lying".


"Published" != "Open".

"Open" = "Published specification, anyone may implement, no royalties apply, freely re-distributable".

H.264 is published, and it is a standard, but it is NOT an open standard.
"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_standard


An open standard is a standard that is publicly available and has various rights to use associated with it, and may also have various properties of how it was designed (e.g. open process).

The terms "open" and "standard" have a wide range of meanings associated with their usage. There are number of definitions of open standards which emphasise different aspects of openness, including of the resulting specification, the openness of the drafting process, and the ownership of rights in the standard. The term "standard" is sometimes restricted to technologies approved by formalized committees that are open to participation by all interested parties and operate on a consensus basis.


Keep arguing. There are probably 30 variations listed on that link.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by mtzmtulivu on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 03:16 in reply to "RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
mtzmtulivu Member since:
2006-11-14

Uh, wrong. It is an open standard.
http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-H.264/e

This doesn't mean there aren't patents & licensing associated with it. Open != free.

So, Apple is perfectly correct in making this statement and is not "lying".

first you declare it to be open and then you acknowledge it to be patented/proprietary. you sir, are double speaking,misinformed or didnt think through your comment,

Patented technology are not "open", they are "proprietary". Since h,264 is proprietary, apple should have included it on the side flash is.

Edited 2010-04-22 03:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by Smeagol on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 05:51 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
Smeagol Member since:
2006-01-16

No! Anyone with enough money to cough up can get in. It's "open"...for business. You are associating Open with the open-source definition. Proprietary means it's mine and no one else can play. Yes, it's a derivative of the definition of open.

Reply Parent Score: 3