Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 22:37 UTC
Google Well, this was about as inevitable as Apple not losing a super-secret iPhone prototype: Google and Adobe have pretty much formed an alliance against the iPhone, in true the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend style. The agreement between the two companies is clearly a big middle finger towards Apple and the iPhone. Update: Apple has finally added a framework to Mac OS X that will enable accelerated Flash video content - something Adobe has been asking for. This should enable Adobe to greatly improve Flash video performance on Mac OS X. Anyone know about Linux?
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Video acceleration on Linux
by Zifre on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 23:13 UTC
Zifre
Member since:
2009-10-04

I have no idea why Adobe doesn't implement video acceleration on Linux. I'm pretty sure that they're just lazy.

They could at least use X-Video, but AFAIK, they don't. If the want, they could use VDPAU or VA-API to get full decode acceleration on NVIDIA hardware and in the future, Intel and AMD hardware. IIRC, even Gnash uses VDPAU. There is really no reason why Adobe should be having any trouble with audio or video on Linux. They just like to complain because it gives them an excuse to be lazy.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Video acceleration on Linux
by Timmmm on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 23:34 in reply to "Video acceleration on Linux"
Timmmm Member since:
2006-07-25

I think you can't overlay anything onto xvideo (i.e. buttons and other flash crap). Flash was never designed to play videos well.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Video acceleration on Linux
by kristoph on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 00:05 in reply to "Video acceleration on Linux"
kristoph Member since:
2006-01-01

They don't because Linux is not important to them. That's why proprietary web technologies are evil (but supporting them, in this case, is good for business - Google's business).

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Reply Parent Score: 1

twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11

They don't because Linux is not important to them. That's why proprietary web technologies are evil (but supporting them, in this case, is good for business - Google's business).

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And it's not important to them because Linux's market share is 1%. And that 1% is scattered across 100 distros which use different kernels, different libs, different apis,different versions of the same lib.

Paying developers to support Linux better isn't commercially justified. But if the likes of Red Hat and Canonical will sign some NDA with Adobe, I'm sure Adobe will be more than happy to let them improve flash for Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Video acceleration on Linux
by Tuxie on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 08:56 in reply to "Video acceleration on Linux"
Tuxie Member since:
2009-04-22

Their Linux flash developer (singular) has written several excuses for this on the official flash-for-linux blog:

http://blogs.adobe.com/penguin.swf/

Basically, instead of targeting the correct way of doing things, meaning VAAPI for video acceleration and let the drivers (VDPAU, XvBA, CrystalHD, etc) catch up with their VAAPI-support, they target specific Linux distribution releases (also legacy ones) and proprietary lowlevel APIs so they get lost in the API jungle and fail to release anything ever.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Dubhthach Member since:
2006-01-12

The caselog for Flash 10.1 to be included in Solaris shows that it uses VPDAU for video acceleration. Of course you have to be using Nvidia graphics card, there is also mention that it supports VAAPI, of course Solaris doesn't currently ship with VAAPI libs (there's a RFE).

http://arc.opensolaris.org/caselog/PSARC/2010/131/mail

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Video acceleration on Linux
by FunkyELF on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 14:47 in reply to "Video acceleration on Linux"
FunkyELF Member since:
2006-07-26

I have no idea why Adobe doesn't implement video acceleration on Linux. I'm pretty sure that they're just lazy.


Don't forget incompetent.

Reply Parent Score: 2