Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 22:37 UTC
Google Well, this was about as inevitable as Apple not losing a super-secret iPhone prototype: Google and Adobe have pretty much formed an alliance against the iPhone, in true the-enemy-of-my-enemy-is-my-friend style. The agreement between the two companies is clearly a big middle finger towards Apple and the iPhone. Update: Apple has finally added a framework to Mac OS X that will enable accelerated Flash video content - something Adobe has been asking for. This should enable Adobe to greatly improve Flash video performance on Mac OS X. Anyone know about Linux?
Thread beginning with comment 420393
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Hilarious Alliance
by Praxis on Thu 22nd Apr 2010 23:56 UTC
Praxis
Member since:
2009-09-17

I have found the recent alliance between Google and Adobe very funny. Google utilizes flash extensively in youtube, but otherwise they have been pushing html5. I can't see Google reversing this overall trend. They want Flash to work as well as it can now, but the future is htlm5. Google is obviously only doing this to stick one to Apple. If Adobe thinks they have found a long term friend they are mistaken.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Hilarious Alliance
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 02:21 in reply to "Hilarious Alliance "
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I think Google has the same perspective as most reasonable people: Sure Flash sucks, but its not our business telling people what apps they can or cannot run on their devices. Let the superior technology win, no need to restrict users freedom.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Hilarious Alliance
by Fettarme H-Milch on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 11:42 in reply to "RE: Hilarious Alliance "
Fettarme H-Milch Member since:
2010-02-16

Sure Flash sucks (...) Let the superior technology win, no need to restrict users freedom.

You're contradicting yourself. On one hand "Flash sucks", but OTOH the "superior technology wins".

Current success of Flash and past success of software like Windows 95 clearly shows that a software's success is in no way a result of technological superiority.
Back in the 1990s OS/2 was -- at least on the technological level -- way more advanced than Win95.
Corporate decisions decided the outcome.
First, in the 1980s IBM (inventor of the PC and long time market share leader) allied with Microsoft to put MS DOS on PCs, later Windows, and then to cooperate on OS/2 development.
When MS already achieved an almost universal vendor lock-in to Windows, MS showed IBM the middle finger because MS didn't want to share any OS profit with IBM and concentrated on Windows.
Those corporate tactics along with some marketing lead to today's Windows market penetration of roughly 90% and not technological superiority.

Back to Flash:
Flash was successful before Adobe bought Macromedia, but it wasn't omnipresent. Adobe even supported SVG.
The current omnipresence of Flash is the result of merging the technology into Adobe's Creative Suite. Adobe used CS's market share to get Flash to content creators "for free" -- in a similar way as Microsoft bundled Internet Explorer for free with Windows.

From my experience the worst part of Flash's performance on OSX and Linux is not video playback, but vector drawing. Adobe could've used OpenGL to speed this up years ago but didn't. Now Adobe is blaming everyone besides themselves on Flash's crappy performance. Using OpenGL on OSX for vector drawing has absolutely nothing to do whether Apple offers a video via GPU decoding SDK or not.

Edited 2010-04-23 11:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Hilarious Alliance
by CoolGoose on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 08:42 in reply to "Hilarious Alliance "
CoolGoose Member since:
2005-07-06

It's more like HTML 5 is the FUTURE and we're living in the PRESENT.

Yes over 3-4 years, when hopefully over 90% of the internauts have a full standards compliant HTML 5 browser (that the standard isn't completely done is another thing), we can talk about a removal of flash.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Hilarious Alliance
by Kroc on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 11:41 in reply to "RE: Hilarious Alliance "
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

iPhone/iPad market share === death of Flash

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Hilarious Alliance
by Fettarme H-Milch on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 11:47 in reply to "RE: Hilarious Alliance "
Fettarme H-Milch Member since:
2010-02-16

It's more like HTML 5 is the FUTURE and we're living in the PRESENT.

Brightcove already modified its highly popular streaming service to support HTML5 video and not only Flash.
I don't know if Brightcove's customers like the New York Times have already rolled out the new version, but that's not a matter of some distant future, but should happen any moment if it didn't already happen.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Hilarious Alliance
by nt_jerkface on Fri 23rd Apr 2010 18:31 in reply to "Hilarious Alliance "
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Google likes Flash for a couple reasons that often go unmentioned.

1. Ads. Flash is better for displaying ads on top of video files and providing feedback.

2. Content protection. Movie companies don't like how HTML 5 video files can be saved locally with a simple right click.

3. IE support. Flash is the easiest way to support IE. IE9 has HTML5 but it is Vista/7 only and more importantly there are office users that will be stuck on older versions of IE for years to come. There is the plug-in option but that would only work if Google stopped supporting Flash.

If Google wanted to replace Flash in the future then they would have designed Chrome OS around HTML 5. By bundling Flash they are making it clear that they will support Flash for another decade. Hulu is also sticking with Flash and those two video providers are enough to keep Flash around even if the rest of the web dumps it.

But this isn't all bad news since Adobe is being pressured by competing technologies which will push them to improve Flash on all platforms.

Reply Parent Score: 4