Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 26th Apr 2010 18:38 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Invented by IBM, the death knell sounded by Apple. Sony has announced it is going to cease selling diskettes altogether, with the last bastion being Japan. Sales will be ceased there too, even though Sony still managed to sell 12 million of them there last year. While Memorex and Imation still produce and sell diskettes, this move by Sony surely means it won't take long for the rest of the market to vanish, too.
Thread beginning with comment 420935
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Die!
by Brendan on Tue 27th Apr 2010 02:38 UTC in reply to "Die!"
Brendan
Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

Can we please just kill off floppy disks already? And while we're at it, kill off the best reason to use floppy disks as well: Windows XP and its stupid "You can't install on a SATA hard disk without putting SATA drivers on a floppy" installer.


Unfortunately, I agree, but for different reasons.

The best reason to use floppy is that it's very well standardised and relatively simple - you can write a floppy device driver in 2 days (including testing) and know that it'll work for all floppy drives (even those ancient 5.25 inch things) in 99.99% of computers that have floppy drives.

On the other hand, for USB flash you'd be looking at a few months work and enough (PCI, UHCI, AHCI, EHCI, etc.) code to fill a floppy, and never be too sure if it works for all flash/storage devices and all USB controllers. CD-ROM is much worse (ATA/ATAPI, SATA, SCSI, SAS, USB, etc.).

The problem here is "need a driver to install a driver". For example, if a company creates a new type of USB controller that an older OS doesn't/can't support, then getting the USB controller driver from a USB device isn't going to work.

-Brendan

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Die!
by computeruser on Tue 27th Apr 2010 03:21 in reply to "RE: Die!"
computeruser Member since:
2009-07-21

The best reason to use floppy is that it's very well standardised and relatively simple - you can write a floppy device driver in 2 days (including testing) and know that it'll work for all floppy drives (even those ancient 5.25 inch things) in 99.99% of computers that have floppy drives.

If you are writing your own drivers for commodity platforms that still support floppy drives, you're wasting your time. There are multiple open source projects available with various licenses that already provide drivers. (And new hardware generally supports floppies only via... USB.)

The problem here is "need a driver to install a driver". For example, if a company creates a new type of USB controller that an older OS doesn't/can't support, then getting the USB controller driver from a USB device isn't going to work.

When was the last time you had a USB controller that didn't work? EHCI is the standard interface for USB 2.0.

Reply Parent Score: 1