Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 29th Apr 2010 20:55 UTC
Microsoft Now this sucks. We've encountered several 'leaks'over the past few months regarding a 'secret' project within Microsoft called Courier. The demonstrations showed a highly innovative dual-touchscreen tablet thingamabob that combined multitouch and pen input to create a completely new user interface. Today, Microsoft confirmed the project's existence (yay!)... By cancelling it (boo!).
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They are not ready yet
by theorz on Thu 29th Apr 2010 21:48 UTC
theorz
Member since:
2006-01-08

Right now Microsoft is not ready to launch a new platform like Courier.

They have had a lot of success layering features on a backwards compatible product. It has worked well and Windows has beaten many (arguably better) competitors over its lifetime because of backwards compatibility.

Now backwards compatibility is losing ground to user experience and a good web browser in regards to what consumers are looking for, but it is not there yet. Devices like the iPad are making inroads into into the average home like no windowsless computer before it. But this is still a small market.

Do people really expect Microsoft to join the leading charge into a web based, legacy application free world? They are going to keep trying to jam full windows onto these devices to preserve their historical advantage.

Now this does not mean they will never release a tablet with an OS designed for a tablet, as their Windows Phone 7 will (hopefully) show they are very capable of creating a new OS with a great user experience. If the iPad along with the coming round of Android and WebOS tablets do start cutting deep into into the home user market Microsoft will be there with a real tablet OS of their own.

Reply Score: 1

RE: They are not ready yet
by kaiwai on Fri 30th Apr 2010 04:51 in reply to "They are not ready yet"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Right now Microsoft is not ready to launch a new platform like Courier.

They have had a lot of success layering features on a backwards compatible product. It has worked well and Windows has beaten many (arguably better) competitors over its lifetime because of backwards compatibility.

Now backwards compatibility is losing ground to user experience and a good web browser in regards to what consumers are looking for, but it is not there yet. Devices like the iPad are making inroads into into the average home like no windowsless computer before it. But this is still a small market.

Do people really expect Microsoft to join the leading charge into a web based, legacy application free world? They are going to keep trying to jam full windows onto these devices to preserve their historical advantage.

Now this does not mean they will never release a tablet with an OS designed for a tablet, as their Windows Phone 7 will (hopefully) show they are very capable of creating a new OS with a great user experience. If the iPad along with the coming round of Android and WebOS tablets do start cutting deep into into the home user market Microsoft will be there with a real tablet OS of their own.


Personally I think the argument from the position of backwards compatibility is largely a myth; if Microsoft did a giant purge of their operating system and it took the form of Windows 9, do you really think that there would be a mass exodus from Windows? where would they go to? a whole new platform that would require whole applications and so forth to be re-written from the ground up versus a cleaned up Windows 9 API that would merely require tweaking around the edge? Occasionally if you're the operating system vendor you have to beat your third party software writers into submission - get them to stop spending money on private jets, cocaine fuelled orgies (aka BroadCom ex-CEO anyone?) and son in favour of actually maintaining their code bases by moving them forward as old technologies are phased out of the operating system.

Take a look at the iPhone for example; is it restrictive? yes. Are there other choices one could develop for? sure. But guess what, Apple keeps whipping the developers over and over again with each release of iPhoneOS - when the OS released your application is expected to work, on launch day, with the new iPhoneOS. The problem with Microsoft is the fat that they just don't have the will power to make a decision such as that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: They are not - WGA
by jabbotts on Fri 30th Apr 2010 18:22 in reply to "RE: They are not ready yet"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I think they have the will to do it but haven't yet tried in a meaningful way. It remains an implementation problem. Consider that WGA was, by Microsoft's own admission, designed to be overly annoying for users in the belief that they would then in turn force third party developers to clean up non-compliant code.

In terms of legacy cruft, MS also has all those enterprise customers that don't want to go back and replace 1995 era apps they've been ignoring updates for since the initial expense. MS could care a whiff for us lowly consumers but they won't risk upsetting the real money from enterprise contracts.

Reply Parent Score: 2