Linked by Kroc Camen on Thu 29th Apr 2010 23:04 UTC
Internet Explorer I am almost flabbergasted by the spin and blunt-face upon which this news is delivered. We were just discussing the pot calling the kettle black with Apple / Adobe and now Microsoft have also come out in favour of a closed video format for an open web--IE9's HTML5 video support will allow H264 only. Update Now that the initial shock is over, I've rewritten the article to actually represent news rather than something on Twitter.
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RE[2]: Comment
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 29th Apr 2010 23:26 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

OS X, Windows and Linux all have h264 support so FF needs to suck it up and use the codec on the OS.


Linux does NOT have H264 support - at least, not legally, and not out of the box. No major Linux distribution out there ships with H264 support because doing so would violate US (and possibly other countries') laws.

Reply Parent Score: 4

v RE[3]: Comment
by modmans2ndcoming on Thu 29th Apr 2010 23:28 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment"
RE[4]: Comment
by segedunum on Thu 29th Apr 2010 23:59 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Anyone who claims they do not use x264 is a liar.

I don't use it and I don't know of any internet video currently that requires it. Even if that were the case you still need a valid license to actually use it, which Firefox cannot provide or guarantee. They would have to effectively dictate what platforms you could run it on.

Edited 2010-04-30 00:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment
by chekr on Fri 30th Apr 2010 01:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment"
chekr Member since:
2005-11-05

Anyone who claims they do not use x264 is a liar.


I don't. Fluendo has me covered (on OpenSolaris). Am I a liar? ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment
by google_ninja on Fri 30th Apr 2010 02:14 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

ffmpeg, vlc, and x264 are all legal, so long as you live in a country without software patents. That means anywhere but north america or korea, with the UK and australia sort of on the fence about the whole thing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment
by lemur2 on Fri 30th Apr 2010 02:48 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

darn... all those thieves on Linux will have to continue stealing the codec. Anyone who claims they do not use x264 is a liar.


x264 is a h264 encoder. I have never encoded any videos with h264 encoding, and I therefore claim that I do not use x264. In fact, I don't have it installed.

Would you like to try again with that comment, and see if you can commit libel against me twice in the one thread?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment
by J. M. on Sat 1st May 2010 05:12 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment"
J. M. Member since:
2005-07-24

Anyone who claims they do not use x264 is a liar.

Anyone who doesn't know what x264 is should learn it first, before making accusations. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment
by lemur2 on Fri 30th Apr 2010 01:48 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"OS X, Windows and Linux all have h264 support so FF needs to suck it up and use the codec on the OS.
Linux does NOT have H264 support - at least, not legally, and not out of the box. No major Linux distribution out there ships with H264 support because doing so would violate US (and possibly other countries') laws. "

Just a minor nitpick ... my Linux machine does include a h264 decoder. It is embedded in the video card hardware.

Since I paid for the video card hardware, I therefore have a paid-for licenase, so my Linux machine does in fact include a legal, licensed h264 decoder. Out of the box. It is simply that this decoder was not shipped with the Linux distribution OS software, but rather it was shipped with the ATI graphics card hardware.

Now, if only ATI would release the specs for the API to this part of the graphics card hardware then I could actually use it (as I am entitled to do as a purchaser of an ATI graphics card) under Linux with the open source ATI driver.

Until everyone can use what they have legally purchased, h264 remains an unsuitable codec for video on the web. Other protocls used for the web (e.g. HTML, CSS, SVG, ECMAscript, DOM, et al) all meet the requirement that they be royalty-free. There is NO reason why the video codec used on the web should fail to meet this requirement also.

Edited 2010-04-30 02:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5