Linked by Kroc Camen on Thu 29th Apr 2010 23:04 UTC
Internet Explorer I am almost flabbergasted by the spin and blunt-face upon which this news is delivered. We were just discussing the pot calling the kettle black with Apple / Adobe and now Microsoft have also come out in favour of a closed video format for an open web--IE9's HTML5 video support will allow H264 only. Update Now that the initial shock is over, I've rewritten the article to actually represent news rather than something on Twitter.
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Tough
by segedunum on Thu 29th Apr 2010 23:42 UTC
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

I'm afraid IE dictates no standards whatsoever when it comes to internet video. If Microsoft had bought YouTube then that might have been different but that's another story. I'm sure they'd love the standard to be WMV rather than h.264 despte their defence of it, but alas...........

Google can see the writing on the wall, which is why they're mulling over and working on VP-8 before they start getting YouTube and themselves into something they cannot go back on later. Whatever YoutTube supports, that's pretty much it and others will follow and if IE won't support what these sites use then IE is the first thing to go up against the wall. Microsoft have nothing to swim against the tide with.

Sorry Microsoft, but you're simply not that important here.

Edited 2010-04-29 23:42 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE: Tough
by MollyC on Fri 30th Apr 2010 00:47 in reply to "Tough"
MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

If YouTube has that much power, that is, monopolistic power, then maybe they should be broken up. Or maybe the EU can mandate that they support the 5 most popular formats for each and every video. Yeah, I went there.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Tough
by WereCatf on Fri 30th Apr 2010 00:59 in reply to "RE: Tough"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Or maybe the EU can mandate that they support the 5 most popular formats for each and every video.

Unlikely, unless they can figure out a legal way of squeezing money out of it and into their pockets.

It's just so frustrating that in the US and anywhere else with software patents being valid this totally pisses on the whole idea of free web, not to mention pissing on the feet of OS enthusiasts, regular home-users with non-mainstream OS, volunteer run computer shops and classes and so on: for OS enthusiasts even if you were to acquire a H.264 decoder it'd most likely be illegal, for regular home-users it'd make them criminals without them even knowing it and they most likely don't know about Fluendo codecs (not to mention their willingness to pay for codecs!), volunteer run shops and classes are often running Linux and as such have to skip H.264 content completely or buy Fluendo codecs for all of their machines..

This is really sad, though I'm not surprised by this news however. It was quite easily expected.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Tough
by modmans2ndcoming on Fri 30th Apr 2010 02:09 in reply to "RE: Tough"
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

Monopoly is not illegal.

Use of Monopoly to gain an unfair advantage in another market or use of a monopoly IS illegal. Google choosing a video format for one of its products is not illegal... no matter how much influence they have.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Tough
by Digihooman on Sat 1st May 2010 03:15 in reply to "RE: Tough"
Digihooman Member since:
2010-05-01

Or perhaps if Microsoft is so powerful as to threaten the freedom of the internet ( it belongs to us, not Microsoft) then Microsoft should be broken up asap.
Cheers all.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Tough
by lemur2 on Fri 30th Apr 2010 02:08 in reply to "Tough"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I'm afraid IE dictates no standards whatsoever when it comes to internet video. If Microsoft had bought YouTube then that might have been different but that's another story. I'm sure they'd love the standard to be WMV rather than h.264 despte their defence of it, but alas........... Google can see the writing on the wall, which is why they're mulling over and working on VP-8 before they start getting YouTube and themselves into something they cannot go back on later. Whatever YoutTube supports, that's pretty much it and others will follow and if IE won't support what these sites use then IE is the first thing to go up against the wall. Microsoft have nothing to swim against the tide with. Sorry Microsoft, but you're simply not that important here.


VP8 can only become the standard video codec for the web if Google release it for use (and implementation for that matter) by anyone, royalty-free.

Royalty-free is a requirement for web standards.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Tough
by aesiamun on Fri 30th Apr 2010 04:21 in reply to "RE: Tough"
aesiamun Member since:
2005-06-29

You keep saying that but fail to back it up with any proof.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Tough
by henderson101 on Fri 30th Apr 2010 10:39 in reply to "RE: Tough"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Royalty-free is a requirement for web standards.


You keep saying that. Over and over again. Repeatedly. It won't make it any closer to something the average user actually cares about though. That is what is important here. That the average user's hardware includes the correct chipsets, software codecs and such to decode the video without lag or stuttering.

Reply Parent Score: 2