Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 30th Apr 2010 21:40 UTC, submitted by Helge
Legal Well, this certainly explains a whole lot. Both Apple and Microsoft have stated that the legality of Theora is highly debatable, and as it turns out, they knew more than we do - most likely courtesy of their close involvement with the MPEG-LA. Responding to an email from Free Software Foundation Europe activist Hugo Roy, Steve Jobs has stated that a patent pool is being assembled to go after Theora. Update: Monty Montgomery of Xiph (Ogg and Theora's parent organisation) has responded on Slashdot: "If Jobs's email is genuine, this is a powerful public gaffe ('All video codecs are covered by patents'). He'd be confirming MPEG's assertion in plain language anyone can understand. It would only strengthen the pushback against software patents and add to Apple's increasing PR mess. Macbooks and iPads may be pretty sweet, but creative individuals don't really like to give their business to jackbooted thugs."
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still can't beat the hardware
by elanthis on Sat 1st May 2010 17:26 UTC
elanthis
Member since:
2007-02-17

If only some company offered REAL competition against the MacBook Pros.

Have you seen the new 17" models? 9+ hours of battery life (under real, actual usage!), a better-than-1080p resolution screen that is absolutely gorgeous, an actually usable for gaming and real work GPU (two GPUs, in fact), and general high quality parts and design. And it runs Windows 7 beautifully and easily.

All of the competitors can pull off equally powerful systems, and a few even have nice high quality screens, but they cost nearly as much ($1500+) and yet still saddle the user with 1.5 hour battery lifetimes and 5x the bulk and weight. And all of these machines come with crapware-infested Windows installs, making them less pleasant Windows machines than the Apples!

When Dell, HP, Sony, Lenovo, or ANYBODY offers a laptop computer that is actually the equivalent of a MacBook Pro, I will stop telling creative professionals (in my line of work, that's game artists and game developers) to buy Apple. I already tell students and business types to aim for cheaper $500 machines from Dell or ASUS or whoever because those make more sense for their needs. I'd love to be able to point people who really do need a very high end laptop to a non-Apple machine that's actually WORTH that price point, but there simply is no such thing.

Apple gets to be dicks because they make the best products around right now. Until somebody bothers to compete with them on their turf, they'll continue to make a lot of sales, make a shitload of money, and have the freedom to lockdown their software however they want. They very literally have a monopoly on high-end laptops and have very little competition in the high-end desktop space as well.

Heck, I live in Redmond literally across the street from Microsoft's main campus (I'm here for the game companies, but this apartment complex is like 95% Microsoft employees), and I still see more Apple laptops than all the other brands combined. That's how nice those machines are: even the Microsoft people know they're the best hardware you can find, period. Most of the game developers around here use the Apple hardware too, even though Mac OS X is not a "gaming OS" (these are the best Windows 7 machines you can buy, though).

Don't get me started on the iPhones. Android gets great reviews, but I've yet to see anyone who can honestly say that the HTC hardware is in any way preferable over the iPhone hardware. I was looking forward to the HTC Incredible but unsurprisingly it turns out the battery life is barely worth crap and the screen is effectively unusable in sunlight. Give me iPhone-quality hardware on Verizon with Android and I'd be very happy, but once again no such thing exists.

Microsoft gets their monopolies often by being unethical, and then they abuse their position. Apple gets its monopolies by actually making absolutely great products, and then they abuse their position. Either way the monopolies suck, but at least in the Apple case the monopoly could be broken if some company just actually freaking tried to compete with them.

Reply Score: 4

Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

This has no relationship whatsoever with the subject at hand.

Except maybe that "creative professionals" may not want to have to pay exorbitant fees for simply displaying a video on their website.

Reply Parent Score: 2

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


Most of the game developers around here use the Apple hardware too, even though Mac OS X is not a "gaming OS" (these are the best Windows 7 machines you can buy, though).


I call BS. I know game developers at a couple studios in that area and they sure as hell don't use Macs. They contract with a company like Dell and get maxed out desktops with next-day parts replacement. I doubt even Popcap has a majority Mac workplace.

As for desktop value the Mac Pro is a complete rip-off when at $2500 it comes with a single quad xeon (xeon?????) and only 3 gigs of RAM. SSD isn't even an option.

Look at their RAID option:
Mac Pro RAID Card $700

Oh and what type of RAID card would that be? They're going to charge $700 and just call it a Mac RAID card? No brand name? No specs? This is RAID for suckers.

Your claim about MS employees loving Macbooks is also questionable. I'm in Redmond sometimes and I don't see a lot of Macbooks at the coffee shops. Seattle on the other hand.

As for Macbooks they have good battery life but that isn't because of the hardware. Their price/performance ratio is poor and both Sony and Asus have better screens. You can't remove the battery, you only get white which is a bad color for heavy use and then there are Apple service charges if the thing breaks out of warranty. Oh and on top of it all you get a glowing Apple on the back so you can make sure to provide free advertising even if the room is dark.

Edited 2010-05-01 21:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

SSD in macs is the worst choice you could do while buying a new MacBook. It's a very expensive option (far more thant the price of the SSD disk itself), and OSX doesn't have TRIM support. So the SSD loses a great part of its performance within a few months of use.

Isn't there a patent in putting a SSD in a computer?

Edited 2010-05-01 22:04 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

If only some company offered REAL competition against the MacBook Pros.

Have you seen the new 17" models? 9+ hours of battery life (under real, actual usage!)


Oh and one more thing you might want to judge the battery based on external review, not Apple's marketing materials.

Still, in regular use we're certainly not bumping past that magical 6 hour mark, and we'd have to really work for Apple's quoted 8-9 hours of battery. Through a day of "regular use," which involved some benchmarking and some iMovie, but mostly just web browsing and typing, with screen brightness hovering around 60-75 percent, WiFi on and an hour of Bluetooth we managed four hours and 34 minutes of juice.
http://www.engadget.com/2010/04/14/macbook-pro-core-i7-review/

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

If only some company offered REAL competition against the MacBook Pros.

Have you seen the new 17" models? 9+ hours of battery life (under real, actual usage!), a better-than-1080p resolution screen that is absolutely gorgeous, an actually usable for gaming and real work GPU (two GPUs, in fact), and general high quality parts and design. And it runs Windows 7 beautifully and easily.


I am a long time Apple disciple but I can tell you that there is nothing special about the hardware which Apple sells (hence I am looking at going to the Windows world at the end of this year - Mac OS X is dying due to neglect by Apple whose focus is now on i-devices instead a balanced approach between i-devices and computers.

1) The times noted on the website you will never ever get in real life - the MacBook 13.3inch model I have right now promised a battery life of up to 7 hours, I can assure you that in my time that if you set the screen brightness to 3/4 and ran well written applications, you would be luck to hit 4 1/2 on a good day. If you wanted that sort of time you can easily purchase a Dell laptop and upgrade the battery to a 9 cell one or get an HP laptop and install a 12 cell battery thus still putting it under the cost of a MacBook Pro.

2) Mac OS X time to shine was when it was competing against Vista; Vista was to Mac OS X as the P4 was to the Athlon. A door opened and like AMD, Apple has failed to step up once Microsoft got back on its feet with the launch of Windows 7. Mark my words, a combination of obsessiveness with i-devices resulting in the ignoring of Mac OS X development on the desktop will ultimate translate into lower growth on the desktop. Not that Apple really gives crap as seen by their behaviour recently but for the 'true believer' its a bit disheartening.

3) OEM's have really lifted the game; ok, they're not as 'thin' as Apple but at least they don't reach a testicle scorching 100 degrees Celsius:

http://www.engadget.com/2010/04/26/core-i7-equipped-macbook-pro-hit...

This thin obsession is truly is pathetic, it is almost as bad as those who rant on about how 'noisy' their desktop or laptop is; come on, if you're spending that much time worrying about the 'thickness' or 'noise' it is clearly obvious to me you're using your laptop merely as a symbol of productivity rather than actually doing anything productive with it. Give me a +1inch laptop that doesn't scorch my balls or overheat or suffer from long term internal damage due to high temperatures.

Edited 2010-05-02 05:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2