Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 3rd May 2010 17:56 UTC
Multimedia, AV Are you guys sick of the H264 debate already? Yes? Too bad, because we've got more. Microsoft's decision late last week to restrict Internet Explorer 9 to H264 was met with a rather immense amount of criticism, so the company decided to publish a new blog post responding to some of that criticism. While Microsoft makes a few good points, the overall feeling is still that of 'fear, uncertainty, and doubt'.
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RE[3]: Comment by Parry Hotter
by Preston5 on Mon 3rd May 2010 22:17 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Parry Hotter"
Preston5
Member since:
2010-03-19

It seems you didn't see that 66% of the videos on the web are encoded in H.264; Theora stands at 4% and I don't think Wikimedia or Dailymotion will be able to convince content providers to switch.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

It seems you didn't see that 66% of the videos on the web are encoded in H.264; Theora stands at 4% and I don't think Wikimedia or Dailymotion will be able to convince content providers to switch.


Mozilla developers seem to be pretty convinced that Google is going to open up VP8.

http://www.h-online.com/open/features/Firefox-and-the-open-web-9893...
Google's prospective announcement of the open sourcing of VP8, due to be made at the Google I/O developers event at the end of May, has been a big fillip for the Mozilla developers who are "excited that Google has been willing and interested to make this contribution. The suggestion of a video tag within the browser came from Opera's CTO, Hakon Wiem Lie, some years ago," and was finally accepted for HTML5. Since then the issue of the patents surrounding H.264 has created problems both for Mozilla and the future of standards on the Web, so it is seen as a significant step forward for Mozilla that Google has used its resources and investment to release a codec that is at least the equal of, and probably superior to, H.264, "on an open basis". The Mozilla developers evidently believe that the codec will be royalty-free and unencumbered by patents when Google makes its announcement.

"But there's work to do going forward, encouraging websites to implement the codec, building tools, making it easier for people to use rich video, and administering everything so it can be done through open standards and HTML5. Opening VP8 is a big step and makes the work in front of us so much more exciting."


My bold.

(This article is in part an interview with Mozilla's Mitchell Baker, chairperson of the Mozilla project, but it is unclear if she is being quoted in this section. Anyway, this represents a second source of this rumour now.).

If Mozilla is right, presumably YouTube will go to VP8, and perhaps Wikipedia would follow. That would change the dynamic considerably.

Edited 2010-05-04 13:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3