Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 4th May 2010 22:42 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Discussions of Apple's strict control over the app store often do not mention that you can deploy cross platform apps using web applications. HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS should allow you to create compelling, applications without having to distribute through Apple. "I am convinced that the HTML5 app route is the best one for a fat slice of the non-game iPhone apps currently out there, especially those that are simple and face stiff competition. Increased interoperability will help them more than a relative lack of eye candy will hinder them. The problem is convincing clients of that."
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What the developer says
by zmmz on Wed 5th May 2010 06:42 UTC
zmmz
Member since:
2010-04-24


Increased interoperability will help them more than a relative lack of eye candy will hinder them. The problem is convincing clients of that.


Not to mention convincing the developers of that. For a nice view of how a developer sees this, check out this article explaining what the guy who made the Facebook iPhone App:
http://techcrunch.com/2010/04/30/joe-hewitt-web-development/

Reply Score: 1

RE: What the developer says
by Laurence on Wed 5th May 2010 07:23 in reply to "What the developer says"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


Not to mention convincing the developers of that. For a nice view of how a developer sees this, check out this article explaining what the guy who made the Facebook iPhone App:
http://techcrunch.com/2010/04/30/joe-hewitt-web-development/

His views are completely contradictory.

One minute he is banging on about how great IE was for innovating the web back in the late 90s and stating that we should be moving back towards a model where web browsers are allowed to break free from the W3C's specification. Then the next minute he is arguing that we should be moving away from Cocoa (et al) as we shouldn't be supporting propitiatory platforms.

Well IE /WAS/ (and still is) a propitiatory platform and that's half the reason the web is suffering so much at the moment.


Furthermore I too was a web developer back then and I remember things a lot differently:
MS went from "innovating" HTML to stifling innovation the moment they'd killed off the competition and locked users into their propitiatory browser. And it's taken 10 years to fix this whole fraking mess.

So no, MS didn't innovate HTML - they tried to kill it off for anyone that wasn't paying into Microsoft.

Edited 2010-05-05 07:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

Actually, he sounds like someone from about a decade ago. It is just sort of strange that he still holds those views.

MS did innovate a hell of a lot, and not all of it was bad. Netscape wasn't exactly a bastion of standards compliance either, they had their own set of proprietary extensions. Thats what the browser wars 1.0 was all about, who can come up with the best toys to give developers to lure them to a specific platform. After about 10 years of dealing with all the problems that the web being tied to a single vendor brought us, browser wars 2.0 is all about who has the best implementation of standards.

This guy sort of sounds like someone who hasn't had to build anything that works on multiple browsers since stuff has started getting better. He does have a point that the W3C moves at the speed of frozen molasses, but it is also kind of strange to be saying this stuff while we are in the middle of a new set of standards actually getting published.

Reply Parent Score: 3