Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 6th May 2010 21:05 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu The recently released 10.04 version of Ubuntu is the third Long Term Support (LTS) version Canonical has released. I installed this new version on four of my laptops (2 netbooks, 1 normal laptop, 1 portable desktop replacement), and here's my impression of it.
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RE[4]: lethal upgrade
by vodoomoth on Fri 7th May 2010 10:24 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: lethal upgrade"
vodoomoth
Member since:
2010-03-30

If you prepare your hard disk with appropriate partitions in this way, and you also save a backup copy of all files in /etc to an archive, then an Ubuntu update to a new version of the OS from a liveCD takes no more than 10 minutes or so (one re-boot with the LiveCD, and a second re-boot to the new OS HD installation is all that is required, and Ubuntu boots in 15 seconds anyway).

I know this is hard to understand for anyone who has installed or restore a Windows OS (the last one I did required about 20 re-boots, and each re-boot took 3 minutes), but it is true.

You're right, it's hard to understand to me, using Vista on a Fujitsu Siemens laptop with 2.0 Ghz Core2 Duo and 2GB of RAM, Vista is still not usable 3 minutes after I switch the power button. Even when resuming from suspend to disk, I still have to wait for more than 90 seconds. Such a pain that I considered installing XP but most drivers are provided only for Vista...

Just bought a new HDD that should be delivered tomorrow for reviving an old Acer notebook. I intend to have a Linux install in addition to XP. Two questions though:
- is that 15-second boot of Ubuntu a reality? if so, I've found my distribution.
- how should I partition that HDD? Number, primary/extended, ... I need some advice.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: lethal upgrade
by Morgan on Fri 7th May 2010 11:20 in reply to "RE[4]: lethal upgrade"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I have similar specs to your machine, in desktop format: Core2Duo 2.2GHz, 2GB RAM etc. Once Grub2 has started it's about 18 seconds to a working GNOME desktop with no HDD grinding. Granted, my dog-slow BIOS boot sequence in itself takes nearly 20 seconds, so my total boot time with any OS sucks. But I can honestly say that on this machine, the only OS that beats Ubuntu is Haiku, and that by only a second or two.

Also, Ubuntu and any OS other than Leopard live on a slow PATA drive, which could be negatively affecting my boot time. Leopard refuses to allow any other OS on the SATA drive and I didn't have a spare SATA for the other OSes; when I do finally get another SATA I'm sure Ubuntu will boot a few seconds faster.

Edited 2010-05-07 11:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: lethal upgrade
by lemur2 on Fri 7th May 2010 11:21 in reply to "RE[4]: lethal upgrade"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Just bought a new HDD that should be delivered tomorrow for reviving an old Acer notebook. I intend to have a Linux install in addition to XP. Two questions though:
- is that 15-second boot of Ubuntu a reality? if so, I've found my distribution.
- how should I partition that HDD? Number, primary/extended, ... I need some advice.


It depends on the machine of course, but even my netbook can boot Lucid in 15 seconds, and my desktop is less than 10.

The simplest scheme is this:
First partition: bootable, NTFS (for Windows), install windows first, but use only up to half of the disk space for this
After installing Windows, then re-boot with a LiveCD, and install a good Linux distribution (Lucid will do) in the unused disk area.
Second partition: ext3 or ext4, mount point = /, say 10GB-20GB
Third partition: swap, 2 * RAMsize (i.e. 2GB if you have 1GB RAM)
Fourth partition: ext3 or ext4, mount point = /home, the rest of the disk

If there are to be only four partitions, it doesn't matter if they are all primary partitions, because you can have up to four.

If you prefer to have a lot of alternate OSes, you will need more than four partitions, so make the NTFS partition a bootable primary partition, and the rest all logical partitions, and you can have as many as you like.

Another trick is to leave the largest partition mounted separately (I make it /mnt/local) and have /home mounted along with /root. On the /mnt/local disk, create an ordinary folder for each user, and sub-folders under that for files, and then put symlinks to the /mnt/local/username/Folders in each username's ~/ (home). This way, each OS can "see" the same data and folders, but there can be separate user config info for each OS. This way, you can have a GNOME desktop and another boot for a KDE desktop, and they won't interfere with each other.

If you install a filesystem driver for Windows, or you make the /mnt/local disk formatted NTFS or FAT32, then all OSes can see the user data files areas without stepping on one another's toes for config settings.

Edited 2010-05-07 11:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: lethal upgrade
by vodoomoth on Fri 7th May 2010 12:15 in reply to "RE[5]: lethal upgrade"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

Thank you lemur2 for the advice.
In fact, I went home this midday and the HDD was in my mailbox... I'll start installing this week-end. Thanks!

Reply Parent Score: 1