Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 6th May 2010 21:05 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu The recently released 10.04 version of Ubuntu is the third Long Term Support (LTS) version Canonical has released. I installed this new version on four of my laptops (2 netbooks, 1 normal laptop, 1 portable desktop replacement), and here's my impression of it.
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RE[7]: lethal upgrade
by lemur2 on Fri 7th May 2010 14:37 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: lethal upgrade"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

"This is a long term release. So your good for the next three years.


Until you want to upgrade software that requires a newer release or a trip to the command line.

Linux is not ready for the typical user until it can handle upgrades properly. That means being able to update a browser in a two year old release without having to open a command prompt. Users should not be told to stick with their current browser version if they want stability. Browsers need to be updated for security reasons and users should not have to choose between security and stability.
"

Who feeds you all this utter FUD? Let me guess ... Windows fansites?

https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-mozilla-daily/+archive/ppa

What is this guff about a command-line?
You can update your system with unsupported packages from this untrusted PPA by adding ppa:ubuntu-mozilla-daily/ppa to your system's Software Sources.

(Hint - copy and paste the bolded text above directly into the "Add source" GUI dialog).

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Repositories/Ubuntu#Adding%20R...

Edited 2010-05-07 14:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[8]: lethal upgrade
by nt_jerkface on Fri 7th May 2010 15:21 in reply to "RE[7]: lethal upgrade"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Well here is some of that command line guff:
http://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-install-openoffice-3.0.0-on-ubuntu...

A comment from that tutorial:


Submitted by geoffrey (not registered) on Tue, 2009-09-15 03:07.
Thank you very much for the instructions on installing oo 3.0 (which I used successfully for 3.1). It's people like you who make Linux such a great thing. (More than an O.S.) I wanted to upgrade OO, but not the kernel and Ubuntu makes that hard. Fortunately I was able to locate this info and it made my day.

Geoffrey


Linux just plain sucks at upgrades compared to Windows and OSX. I'm sorry if you can't see that.

It doesn't have to be this way. The distros could build systems that keep the applications independent of the OS.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[9]: lethal upgrade
by vivainio on Fri 7th May 2010 18:21 in reply to "RE[8]: lethal upgrade"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


Linux just plain sucks at upgrades compared to Windows and OSX. I'm sorry if you can't see that.

It doesn't have to be this way. The distros could build systems that keep the applications independent of the OS.


Such a mechanism is in place already: private repositories (e.g. backports, ubuntu ppa...).

For example I currently keep getting ever more glorious version of chrome beta even if I'm on a stable distribution. An openoffice PPA could do the same thing (I don't know if there is one already).

Repository approach makes implementing custom solutions unnecessary (e.g. no need for "google updater", or programs checking for the website on their own).

Even if an application was a hard dependency of some other application vital to the OS, you can provide a new package with different package & binary name, completely independent of the rest of the OS.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: lethal upgrade
by lemur2 on Sat 8th May 2010 10:01 in reply to "RE[8]: lethal upgrade"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Linux just plain sucks at upgrades compared to Windows and OSX. I'm sorry if you can't see that.

It doesn't have to be this way. The distros could build systems that keep the applications independent of the OS.


https://launchpad.net/~openoffice-pkgs/+archive/ppa

Having pointed this out, you are better off upgrading to Lucid if you want recent versions (provided that Lucid works when you test it out via the liveCD).

This is trivial to do as long as you have /home on a separate partition.

Mind you ... even if you didn't install Hardy with /home on a separate partition, if you do have enough spare space you can always make a new partition and then copy all of /home on to it, and THEN re-install Lucid.

Or, alternatively, you could just backup /home and /etc (perhaps on to a device like this: http://www.ccpu.com.au/show_prod.php?class_id=disk-hdd-lap&prod_id=... ), wipe your hard disk, install Luicd with a separate /home partition, and then restore /home from your backup.

As a bonus, you get ALL your applications, not just OpenOffice, upgraded to the latest version (a feat that would cost you a fortune with commercial Windows applications), AND you get a cheap portable USB hard disk.

Edited 2010-05-08 10:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2