Linked by Kroc Camen on Sun 9th May 2010 12:34 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y "Dear Ubuntu, for the last couple years life has been good. Every time I've shown you to a friend or family member, they've compared you to what they're familiar with--Windows XP or Vista, mostly--and by comparison you've looked brilliant. Yeah, your ugly brown color scheme was a bit off-putting at first, but once people saw how secure, simple, and reliable you were, the response was almost universally positive. But recently, things have changed ..."
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Great story. Compelling and rich...
by callinyouin on Sun 9th May 2010 14:49 UTC
callinyouin
Member since:
2008-12-15

Windows 7 still makes you look ridiculous. Sorry, but it’s true.


Uhhh... and? Am I supposed to look at the screenshots, read some unsubstantiated claim about Ubuntu's appearance and simply take his word for it?
I don't get it. What about 7's UI makes Ubuntu look "ridiculous"? Where's the evidence to back up these claims? I honestly prefer Ubuntu's new look over 7's, but whatever.
I wanted to be through with this article but was curious to see if the author included anything meaningful, so I read on.

Yes, you remain pleasantly secure, but guess what – Windows 7 is quite a bit better in this regard.

Am I missing something here? Why would Ubuntu, or any flavor of Linux, need something like Microsoft Security Essentials? Sure, it's great that MS has FINALLY decided to provide a tool for protecting its users, but just because it exists on their platform doesn't mean that it's "better" at security than another platform that doesn't require a tool like this. Seriously, does this make sense to anyone?? Am I just lost here? Help me out!

While I do agree that criticism will only make Linux a better OS, I think there are far better arguments out there on the Interwebz than the BS in this article. Out of all the critical comparisons of Ubuntu and Windows 7 out there, why oh why was this one picked for coverage on OSNews???

Reply Score: 3

zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

Actually, every single version of Linux is hideously vulnerable to the user sitting at the keyboard.

Windows has made huge strides in protecting the user from himself. Linux has not.

Reply Parent Score: 3

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Actually, every single version of Linux is hideously vulnerable to the user sitting at the keyboard.

Windows has made huge strides in protecting the user from himself. Linux has not.

Windows has shoved anti-virus software that is in many ways more disastrous than the malicious software that it claims to "protect" against. As several articles in the past have proven, including a recent news article, they are failing miserably at it. Windows has given us UAC, which has proven to be nothing more than a PITA to get developers (including Microsoft themselves, how ironic) to write software in a more sane, less-privilaged way. Yet all it takes is a click of "OK" to get full admin privileges--what a joke, every Windows user is trained right from the start to simply click "OK," "Next," "Continue," or "Yes" to get to what they want (oldest trick in the book for Windows scammers and malware writers).

Meanwhile, Linux continues to be resistant to viruses and other malware by its very design, and has had non-root users as its main user type for how long now? The way I see it, Windows is just catching up with Linux and other UNIX and UNIX-like systems. Linux can just sit back, fixing bugs that matter to it, which luckily doesn't include constant "virus taking over the whole system, stealing data and joining a botnet" crap.

The "advances" Linux has made to "protect" users from themselves seem like a joke in comparison. Two that come to mind are X.Org not allowing Ctrl+Alt+Bksp to kill the X server and all child processes, and disallowing "sudo rm -rf /" for anyone dumb enough to be fooled into doing it.

Edited 2010-05-10 03:36 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Actually, every single version of Linux is hideously vulnerable to the user sitting at the keyboard.


Pray tell, how so?

I have personally introduced dozens of ordinary people as new users of desktop Linux distributions, and none of them have managed to inflict the slightest damge whilst sitting at their keyboards.

Edited 2010-05-10 04:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2