Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 10th May 2010 10:03 UTC, submitted by robertson
BeOS & Derivatives Two news items about alternative operating system news in a row? What is this, Christmas? In any case, the Haiku project, the darling of OSNews (hey it's okay now), has released its second alpha release. This new stable development release contains some serious improvements over the first alpha.
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RE: Making progresses, but...
by matako on Mon 10th May 2010 18:22 UTC in reply to "Making progresses, but..."
matako
Member since:
2009-02-13

Right now Haiku aims at a different kind of users. The one who are able to produce stuff or at least are willing to give some meaningful feedback, file bug tickets ... the trailblazers. The second wave can only come after the hard part is done.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Right now Haiku aims at a different kind of users. The one who are able to produce stuff or at least are willing to give some meaningful feedback, file bug tickets ... the trailblazers. The second wave can only come after the hard part is done.

That's fair, except that developers are users too. Why would people work on an OS which they don't like as users, which they wouldn't use on a regular basis ?

I am a developer *and* an user. As a computer user, I like Linux for the reasons given above. So if I want, as a developer, to code some user-oriented app, I'll probably do it on Linux, because it's my preferred OS. And code for Linux, too, be it for testing purposes or because I want to use my soft too. All that even though I think that anything GUI-related on Linux is just horrible.

Now what if, as an example, I got a Linux-like user experience, but with a better API like that of Haiku ? As an user, I wouldn't care. As a developer, I'd prefer Haiku's API. So then I'd switch to Haiku. But user decisions always win facing developer's decisions, at least in my brain ^^

Edited 2010-05-10 18:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Bully Member since:
2006-04-07

That's fair, except that developers are users too. Why would people work on an OS which they don't like as users, which they wouldn't use on a regular basis ?


You shouldn't work on an OS you don't like.
Wouldn't make sense, so maybe Haiku just isn't the OS for you.
But don't assume that if you don't like it, that every developer won't like it either though.

Edited 2010-05-11 16:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2