Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 12th May 2010 15:41 UTC
Microsoft The Microsoft empire is built upon two pillars: the Windows operating system, and Microsoft Office. Windows 7 made its way unto the scene last year, and now it's time to work on the other pillar. Today, Microsoft officially launched Microsoft Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010. Regular customers will be able to purchase the new versions next month, starting at 119 USD.
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Recently installed the beta
by morglum666 on Thu 13th May 2010 13:05 UTC
morglum666
Member since:
2005-07-06

I recently installed the beta and used Word 2010 and again hands down it crushes the last remnants of competition. If you are on office 2003 or earlier you should also try Outlook 2007 or later as its also one of the best products for general use I have ever used.

Office defines "Friendly". Office 2010 ribbon is customizable, which removes the final gripe people had about Office 2007.

My general feeling with Microsoft is that they are so-so on the client OS front (Xp was fine, vista was terrible, 7 is sweet), really solid on the server arena (2000,2003,2008 server) and quite impressive in their other offerings (Active directory, SQL Server, and Office is best in class).

I don't understand why any linux user wouldn't be excited about using a web based version of office. It lets you use your OS of choice and a productivity application that is best in class. Google doesn't even come close, sorry.

Morglum

Reply Score: 2

RE: Recently installed the beta
by darknexus on Thu 13th May 2010 14:11 in reply to "Recently installed the beta"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I don't understand why any linux user wouldn't be excited about using a web based version of office. It lets you use your OS of choice and a productivity application that is best in class.


Well, there is the little matter of your data being given to Microsoft. Aside from that though, will it work on Linux? I'm actually asking, as Microsoft isn't exactly known for programming things in a cross-browser way, and typically they tie their web products to IE somehow.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Recently installed the beta
by lemur2 on Fri 14th May 2010 00:01 in reply to "Recently installed the beta"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I recently installed the beta and used Word 2010 and again hands down it crushes the last remnants of competition. If you are on office 2003 or earlier you should also try Outlook 2007 or later as its also one of the best products for general use I have ever used. Office defines "Friendly". Office 2010 ribbon is customizable, which removes the final gripe people had about Office 2007. My general feeling with Microsoft is that they are so-so on the client OS front (Xp was fine, vista was terrible, 7 is sweet), really solid on the server arena (2000,2003,2008 server) and quite impressive in their other offerings (Active directory, SQL Server, and Office is best in class). I don't understand why any linux user wouldn't be excited about using a web based version of office. It lets you use your OS of choice and a productivity application that is best in class. Google doesn't even come close, sorry. Morglum


Here is a counter-viewpoint, written (by someone else) from a small business perspective, presented here in the interests of some balance to outlandish claims such as that quoted above:

http://www.smallbusinesscomputing.com/features/article.php/3881646/....

Microsoft is getting ready to ship Office 2010, but a lot of small businesses realize they don't need all the features (or licensing costs) that come with Microsoft Office. The front-runners for Office replacements are OpenOffice.org and Google Docs, but which one is right for your business?


Apart from the fact that there are perfectly viable, perfectly useable and functional free (and freedom, e.g. from audit by the BSA) solutions to Office software available to businesses, there is also the important points of data interoperability and data "sovreignity" to consider.

If one wants to be able to inter-operate, both now and into the future, with other businesses and government departments, who may use any of OpenDocument (ISO/IEC 26300), legacy MS Office (.doc et al) or ECMA 376 (.docx et al), then OpenOffice is the clear and obvious choice.

PS: Note that MS Office 2010 does not support either standards-compliant ODF (ISO/IEC 26300) nor OOXML (ISO/IEC 29500) formats.

Reply Parent Score: 2