Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 13th May 2010 18:39 UTC, submitted by hotice
Gnome The problem with just about every virtual desktop implementation is just that - they're virtual. This means that beyond the ability to move windows to specific desktops, you're still looking at exactly the same desktop, no matter what virtual desktop number you switched to. A mockup for GNOME Shell is trying to take the virtual out of virtual desktop.
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RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by Kalessin on Thu 13th May 2010 19:25 UTC in reply to "Comment by mtzmtulivu"
Kalessin
Member since:
2007-01-18

Wow. I had no clue you could do that. You could have a different wallpaper on each desktop in KDE 3, but I had no clue that you could do that in KDE 4. I knew nothing about "activities," and I thought that they just hadn't gotten around to implementing it yet in KDE 4. I'll obviously have to look into this further.

Of course, as awesome as KDE is, it's usually so awesome that you don't have a clue about a large portion of what's there and what it can do. There are probably dozens of great shortcuts that I haven't stumbled on yet, let alone full-blown features that I don't have a clue exists.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by mtzmtulivu on Thu 13th May 2010 19:39 in reply to "RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
mtzmtulivu Member since:
2006-11-14

activities are a central part of kde4 desktop and an understanding of how they work is critical if you want to fully use kde4.

Activities have an all or nothing approach. You can set your desktop to only have one activity in all virtual desktop and all your virtual desktop will be identical(because they will all look at the same activity) or you can set your desktop to have different activity for each desktop and all virtual desktops will be completely independent of one another and they wont be able share a wallpaper or icons or anything on the desktop.

kde4 currently ship with two activities,folder view and desktop.

Folder view activity gives the "traditional desktop", the kind of desktop you see in kde3 or windows. It is basically gives a dumb virtual desktop that shows the contents of ~/Desktop folder

Edited 2010-05-13 19:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by tyrione on Thu 13th May 2010 21:05 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
tyrione Member since:
2005-11-21

activities are a central part of kde4 desktop and an understanding of how they work is critical if you want to fully use kde4.

Activities have an all or nothing approach. You can set your desktop to only have one activity in all virtual desktop and all your virtual desktop will be identical(because they will all look at the same activity) or you can set your desktop to have different activity for each desktop and all virtual desktops will be completely independent of one another and they wont be able share a wallpaper or icons or anything on the desktop.

kde4 currently ship with two activities,folder view and desktop.

Folder view activity gives the "traditional desktop", the kind of desktop you see in kde3 or windows. It is basically gives a dumb virtual desktop that shows the contents of ~/Desktop folder


Great, but each virtual desktop isn't independent. I can't set VD1 to be a Folder, VD2 to be a default Desktop, so on and so forth.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by Morty on Thu 13th May 2010 22:52 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

Folder view activity gives the "traditional desktop", the kind of desktop you see in kde3 or windows. It is basically gives a dumb virtual desktop that shows the contents of ~/Desktop folder

And of course it's KDE so you do not need it to be simply a dumb desktop. As the folder view have access to and can use all the regular kio-slaves. You can have a virtual desktop showing remote files, with ftp:// or one of the other remote slaves. Or perhaps one containing files based on a metadata search with neopomuk://.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by WereCatf on Thu 13th May 2010 19:49 in reply to "RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Of course, as awesome as KDE is, it's usually so awesome that you don't have a clue about a large portion of what's there and what it can do. There are probably dozens of great shortcuts that I haven't stumbled on yet, let alone full-blown features that I don't have a clue exists.

Indeed. I still try KDE4 almost every month just plain because I don't like giving up easily, I love all the smooth animations and such, but I always end up going back to GNOME because everything is so unintuitive :/

Oh well, I don't want to transform this into a KDE4 vs GNOME fight here, everyone has their own tastes and opinions.

As for the article in question: I tried GNOME-Shell out earlier today and it sure manages to make using virtual desktops a lot easier and actually approachable even by newcomers, and this mockup is quite a good idea in that it transforms into much more than just a shell for selecting the current virtual desktop. Though, I still personally most likely won't be using them, I've never liked virtual desktops ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by panzi on Thu 13th May 2010 20:36 in reply to "RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
panzi Member since:
2006-01-22

The awesome thing about KDE is that you can see (and change) all standard shortcuts (like ctrl+c, ctrl+v, ...) and all global shortcuts at one place in the control center (under keyboard & mouse).

Reply Parent Score: 3