Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 15th May 2010 08:49 UTC, submitted by kragil
Amiga & AROS A few weeks ago, Novell and Red Hat jointly fended off a patent infringement suit thrown their way by a patent troll. The patent in question more or less came down to the concept of virtual desktops - and thanks to Groklaw, several people helped in finding cases of prior art. The most interesting one of all? A carefully restored and working Amiga 1000 demonstrated to the judge and jury.
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MORB
Member since:
2005-07-06

AmigaOS is still one of the most advanced pieces of software out there ... sad really, because it is 26 years old.


It's pretty cool that using an amiga helped fend off a patent troll and I respect that. It might be the last useful thing the amiga ever does, and it certainly is the first useful thing it did in the last 15 years.

However calling AmigaOS "the most advanced piece of software out there" is displaying a scary disconnection with reality.

Reply Parent Score: 6

kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

Total quote FAIL.

"one of the most" is what I wrote and that is still true. Many areas in AmigaOS have not been surpassed by any other OS. (want a example? Sure thing: Driver installation/removal, just copy/delete a file to the driver directory)

Reply Parent Score: 2

MORB Member since:
2005-07-06

want a example? Sure thing: Driver installation/removal, just copy/delete a file to the driver directory


Yeah. Now your problem is that I used (and developped on) an amiga until 2001 so I know that you're pretty much full of shit.
I had to play around with my system files, and to do some hardcore troubleshooting all the time to do the most trivial things. What you describe is some kind of ideal situation that never held true in practice.

Oh, and I can't remember the last time I had to install a driver in linux.

And lastly even installing drivers on windows is easier than copying a file into the drivers directory... Because you don't have to locate such a goddamn directory at all. It just knows where to install itself.

Reply Parent Score: 3

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Given your use of "fail" I wonder if you were even alive when the Amiga was still relevant.

Reply Parent Score: 3

jjmckay Member since:
2005-11-11

and it certainly is the first useful thing it did in the last 15 years.


Not that you are one to embellish either.

Windows Vista/7 still don't handle multiple screens as well as the Amigas did 24 years ago. Many programs or games can lock up when alt-tabbing. There's no visual representation of programs underneath others, and as is the case with the human brain, a clear visual representation makes a UI more intuitive and functional.

As far as functionality goes, yes, I'd say that the Amiga's layered screens system is more advanced than Windows 7, and perhaps also X's. Just because it was coded decades ago doesn't automatically mean it's inferior. It had access to fewer hardware resources, that's all.

Edited 2010-05-15 13:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

The Amiga’s graphics hardware is still ahead of the game. Not in power, but in design.

The IBM reference platform, and GPUs on an IRQ bus is the worst possible design hacked together by IBM without any consideration for the future.

IBM gave the industry a retarded monkey, and the industry strapped rockets to it.

Remember to put this in perspective -- the first consumer 2D/3D graphics cards started appearing in 1995. Over 10 years after the Amiga.

10 years in computing is an age. Ten years ago we were using Windows 98 / NT with 32-128 MB of RAM.

We are amazed at the realism of graphics produced now, but that’s only been possible after enough money was thrown at an inefficient and inappropriate design. The success of the IBM PC put the graphics industry back 10 years. Had we started with the Amiga and gone from there, films like Avatar would have come out ten years ago.

I have yet to see any innovation in the graphics space that isn’t throwing more horespower at the problem.

Reply Parent Score: 4

MORB Member since:
2005-07-06

"and it certainly is the first useful thing it did in the last 15 years.


Not that you are one to embellish either.

Windows Vista/7 still don't handle multiple screens as well as the Amigas did 24 years ago. Many programs or games can lock up when alt-tabbing. There's no visual representation of programs underneath others, and as is the case with the human brain, a clear visual representation makes a UI more intuitive and functional.

As far as functionality goes, yes, I'd say that the Amiga's layered screens system is more advanced than Windows 7, and perhaps also X's. Just because it was coded decades ago doesn't automatically mean it's inferior. It had access to fewer hardware resources, that's all.
"

The amiga screen system was nothing more than a clever hardware trick that is not really even possible or useful anymore in this day and age.
Yeah, windows 7 sucks with its lack of virtual desktops, but why are you assuming that I uphold windows 7 as the be all end all of operating systems? I'm really more of a linux guy.

And in linux, it would be prefectly possible to reproduce the amiga's screen (aka desktops).

You know why no one does? Because it's useless. Switching from a destkop to another is useful. Having a pager or gestures or compositing based mosaic effect to do so is useful.

We have many more useful ways to manage desktops on modern hardware than that cute yet ultimately worthless copper-based hack on the amiga chipset.

Reply Parent Score: 3

viton Member since:
2005-08-09

Don't troll with Amiga or Amiga will come after you ^_^

Reply Parent Score: 3