Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th May 2010 16:28 UTC, submitted by bnolsen
Multimedia, AV Yes, I broke my own rules and used a "breaking" modifier for this story (let me have my fun for once). Here we have it, as the rumour mill suggested, Google has released the On2 VP8 video codec as open source (royalty free, BSD-style), while also launching the WebM container format which combines a VP8 video stream with Vorbis audio. Support for WebM has been enabled on YouTube's HTML5 beta, and you can download patches against ffmpeg as well as DirectShow filters for Windows (Gstreamer plugins are labelled as "coming soon"). Mac users are out of luck for now; no QuickTime plugins have been announced yet. Update: The WebM blog is now open - and the list of partners is pretty decent already. It includes ARM, NVIDIA, AMD, Qualcomm, and many others. Update II: VP8 will be baked into Flash. Update III: The Opera labs version with WebM support has been released too, for Linux, Mac, and Windows.
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RE[2]: Someone will complain
by nt_jerkface on Wed 19th May 2010 19:17 UTC in reply to "RE: Someone will complain"
nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26


One negative aspect is that it could lead to closed source forks which are incompatible between one another.


If there are any incompatible forks they will likely be open source.

BSD is a much better fit for a codec since it can be used in proprietary browsers and video players without any issues.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Someone will complain
by lemur2 on Wed 19th May 2010 23:59 in reply to "RE[2]: Someone will complain"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

" One negative aspect is that it could lead to closed source forks which are incompatible between one another.
If there are any incompatible forks they will likely be open source. "

Hardly. The whole goal of open source is to satisfy a need of developers and users ... and therefore compatibility would be a primary aim. The whole goal of making an incompatible variant is to lock people in to your product only.

If there are going to be any incompatible forks they will likely be closed source.

BSD is a much better fit for a codec since it can be used in proprietary browsers and video players without any issues.


Wow. We actually agree on something for once.

The license terms for any piece of software are set by the authors/owners of that software. Google's purpose is therefore what counts, and what should determine the license they choose, and Googles purpose here is clearly best served by a BSD-style license.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Someone will complain
by nt_jerkface on Thu 20th May 2010 03:27 in reply to "RE[3]: Someone will complain"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Hardly. The whole goal of open source is to satisfy a need of developers and users ... and therefore compatibility would be a primary aim.


Why isn't compatibility a primary aim of distro creators? Is there some charter of open source that they haven't read? Perhaps Linux audio developers need to look at that charter as well.


The whole goal of making an incompatible variant is to lock people in to your product only.


Incompatibility is more often caused by apathy. Forks occur for a variety of reasons and developers have limited resources so compatibility is not always a priority.


If there are going to be any incompatible forks they will likely be closed source.


No I think in this case a people's programmer is more likely to fork than a company. Building a commercial codec with VP8 as a base is a very sketchy business proposition.

Reply Parent Score: 1