Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th May 2010 18:59 UTC, submitted by kragil
Internet Explorer This warrants a new post as far as I'm concerned, mostly because the original post is getting buried in updates and will soon drop below the fold. Microsoft has just announced it will support VP8 in HTML5 video in Internet Explorer 9, but only if the user has the DirectShow filter installed. Update: Yes, the updates keep on coming. Zencoder has added support for VP8. Update II: Zencoder's side project, video.js, offers a player that can fallback between h.264, OGG and VP8 on most browsers. Support for Android browsers is underway too. Update III: The H264 supporters' hardware argument for mobile is sounding moot too, since ARM explains on its blog that mobile devices with Cortex-A8 and Snapdragon processors "will be able to take advantage of WebM" through those chips' NEON SIMD engine.
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RE[3]: Thanks MS
by badtz on Thu 20th May 2010 07:07 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Thanks MS"
badtz
Member since:
2005-06-29

Apple I would argue was the first to really push into HTML5 (on the browser front).... to this day, they have the furthest implementation of it ... nothing to do with H.264

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Thanks MS
by Laurence on Thu 20th May 2010 10:21 in reply to "RE[3]: Thanks MS"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Apple I would argue was the first to really push into HTML5 (on the browser front).... to this day, they have the furthest implementation of it ... nothing to do with H.264


I can't speak for the current HTML5 implementation, but Apple have been marginally behind Opera for much of the ACID3 testing (Opera actually scored 100% before webkit/Safari did).

But I do agree that Apple have also been front runners.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Thanks MS
by Manish on Thu 20th May 2010 12:35 in reply to "RE[3]: Thanks MS"
Manish Member since:
2009-12-18

nothing to do with H.264

Apple has interest in H.264 more than HTML5.

They are pushing HTML5 basically for H.264. If they really want to be so open, then why don't they open up the iPhone/iPad app distribution model and allow side-loading of apps?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Thanks MS
by lemur2 on Thu 20th May 2010 12:59 in reply to "RE[4]: Thanks MS"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

" nothing to do with H.264

Apple has interest in H.264 more than HTML5.

They are pushing HTML5 basically for H.264. If they really want to be so open, then why don't they open up the iPhone/iPad app distribution model and allow side-loading of apps?
"

HTML5 has nothing to do with H.264. The W3C originally specified Theora as the video codec for HTML5, but Apple threw a hissy fit (and Google said that Theora wasn't good enough for YouTube, which was true at the time), and so the W3C had to take Theora out of the HTML5 spec because of lack of consensus.

HTML5 now simply fails to mention any codec. It does not recommend H.264.

Perhaps now that Google have made WebM another open, royalty-free video codec option, and Google are happy with that performance, then W3C can now fix HTML5 and make it specify WebM instead, an Apple consensus be dammed (you can't please everybody).

Edited 2010-05-20 13:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3