Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 21st May 2010 12:45 UTC, submitted by martini
OS/2 and eComStation After god knows how many years, it's finally here: the final release of eComStation 2.0. We first reported on eComStation 2.0 back in December 2005, when the first beta was released, and between then and now, we've seen countless betas and release candidates come and go, but the wait is finally over.
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This would be more exciting...
by madcrow on Fri 21st May 2010 12:58 UTC
madcrow
Member since:
2006-03-13

If it wasn't so darn expensive. The darn thing costs $150 for the "home" version and $260 for the "business" edition. Few people are going to pay that. While somebody might be willing to pay $50 or so to take an OS/2 nostalgia trip, I can't think of anyone who would pay triple that for the privilege.

Reply Score: 8

Earl Colby pottinger Member since:
2005-07-06

I was reading your first sentence and $49.99 popped into my head as I was reading. $150 is too much for something I probably will not use in the long term but would like to play with.

Edited 2010-05-21 13:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

danieldk Member since:
2005-11-18

I was reading your first sentence and $49.99 popped into my head as I was reading. $150 is too much for something I probably will not use in the long term but would like to play with.


And even then you'll be in for a rough ride. It is a 90'ies operating system with driver updates to bring it into the 21st century crouching on its knees. I don't want to be a troll, but even in the 2000-2001 timeframe when I played with it, it was quite instable, ugly, and outdated. The competition for this system was Windows 95, and those days are long gone.

Reply Parent Score: 3

boblowski Member since:
2007-07-23

So? Apple expects that this year alone about 8 million people pay up to $900 for "something they probably will not use in the long term but would like to play with."

:-P

Reply Parent Score: 5

Sparrowhawk Member since:
2005-07-11

Yes, I have to agree. I would actually only have to pay the upgrade fee as I have bought each of the previous versions. But, frankly, it's still too much considering that I really only have it around in a VM for nostalgic reasons. None of my clients now use OS/2, so I have no need to for an eCS test bed any longer (I do database and web app work mostly).

Of course, if your main OS is eCS, then I suspect that the upgrade fee is actually rather good value for money. A lot of work has gone into this release, and despite the fact that the OS is perhaps neither the prettiest nor that very well known, it does serve a market and does so extremely well (rock stable, lots of up to date software, especially open source but also commercial stuff).

So, although I won't be buying it (unless they drop the price or do a promo), I do wish both the development team and the OS itself all the best.

Edit: typos

Edited 2010-05-21 13:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

factfinding
by frajo on Sat 22nd May 2010 13:43 in reply to "RE: This would be more exciting..."
frajo Member since:
2007-06-29

the fact that the OS is perhaps neither the prettiest
How can prettiness be a fact?

Reply Parent Score: 1

MacMan Member since:
2006-11-19

My guess is that most 'people' would have no interest in eComStation, most purchasers will be banks and other corporations that have a large installed base of OS/2 computers. So, I suppose the pricing is rather cheap, considering that corporations don't seem to care about how much they spend (look at xeon pricing).

BTW, does anyone have any idea if the terminals installed at Lowe's, HomeDepot or Barnes and Noble are OS/2 systems??? From looking at them, they sure look that way.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Xeon pricing? Like intel xeon processors? For servers? They really aren't that bad and have the best ( for my applications) price/performance ratio.

Reply Parent Score: 2

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

If it wasn't so darn expensive. The darn thing costs $150 for the "home" version and $260 for the "business" edition. Few people are going to pay that. While somebody might be willing to pay $50 or so to take an OS/2 nostalgia trip, I can't think of anyone who would pay triple that for the privilege.


If they install it on 5 computers (as they are allowed to), then they are only spending $30 (per PC) for it. ;)

And $250 for an unlimited installation license is uber-cheap.

Edited 2010-05-21 18:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

dayalsoap Member since:
2010-05-19

I'm just curious as to what benefits eComStation will bring me.

What are it's strengths over Ubuntu or Fedora?

Reply Parent Score: 1