Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 21st May 2010 12:45 UTC, submitted by martini
OS/2 and eComStation After god knows how many years, it's finally here: the final release of eComStation 2.0. We first reported on eComStation 2.0 back in December 2005, when the first beta was released, and between then and now, we've seen countless betas and release candidates come and go, but the wait is finally over.
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Hmm
by Ultimatebadass on Fri 21st May 2010 13:33 UTC
Ultimatebadass
Member since:
2006-01-08

I think I'm just missing the "awesome" in this thing.

149$ for "home and student"? Are they kidding? What can this 1990s time machine do for a "home and student" user, that Linux can't do for free? Or better yet, Windows 7 that costs around the same amount?

Reply Score: 8

RE: Hmm
by warpcafe on Fri 21st May 2010 15:48 in reply to "Hmm"
warpcafe Member since:
2009-09-09

Hi,
you are right. There is a lot it can't do, even at its high price. The thing is, people still think eCS WILL or MUST HAVE TO compete with Windows [whatever], Linux flavours or Mac... but that's simply not true. Other than that, nobody forces you to buy it.

While its UI will never be as pretty as Win/Mac, nor its core will ever be as "good" or "open" as with Linux, it's being "the thing in between" that I like. Windows is hiding its ugly internals behind polished interfaces and Linux will (forever) do exactly what you want it to do only if you quit its GUI and type a 300+ chars commandline by heart in a shell.

True, the kernel is 32bit "only" and will perhaps never grow to anything beyond that unless rewritten from scratch (good luck here...) and in some time, hardware will cease to support 32bit architecture. Who cares? I'll ride the pony til it dies. That day come, can still decide which OS to go with... Haiku? Why not.

Until then, I gladly pay 149 bucks to have an OS that has no exposure to any virus threat and (especially important for Germany) no way of being able to incorporate a government backdoor spyware. I can surf the web, do emails and use word processing and spreadsheets. That's it. For entertainment, I have a TV, a Wii, a smartphone and -yes- a Windblows machine here (which runs Ubuntu in a VM in case I need to bring some work home...)

Cheers,
Thomas

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Hmm
by nt_jerkface on Fri 21st May 2010 16:26 in reply to "RE: Hmm"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

OS/2 is dead.

The only place this OS fits is in business terminals and memories.

You're better off paying a psychiatrist $150 so he can help you with your denial issues.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Hmm
by Kebabbert on Fri 21st May 2010 16:30 in reply to "RE: Hmm"
Kebabbert Member since:
2007-07-27

This high price is for those companies that have a OS/2 solution, and must upgrade. They are the only one that are willing to pay. OS/2 will never get any new users, and they know it. They are not after new users. It is better to milk the old cow as much as possible. It they really wanted to increase the user base, they would have a much reasonable and lower price. But they know they can not compete with the open sourced OSes.

32bit kernel? That is not... a good choice for an OS, too limited. Even today, people can not use 32bit Windows to its full extent, more and more need the power and memory freedom from 64bit. If you really need stability and performance and no practical limitations, choose a real Unix, not Linux.

BTW, it is funny that OS/2 has GUI tech from Amiga, whereas Amiga got REXX scripting language in return, as Arexx.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Hmm
by poundsmack on Fri 21st May 2010 18:02 in reply to "Hmm"
poundsmack Member since:
2005-07-13

Personally I think the new low price is great. I really do like eComStation and 2.0 is a stellar release. It has just enough modern software to work as a good laptop OS, and very lower hardware requirements. I can also play all my old DOS games when i am feeling extra nostalgic (yes i can do that in XP for teh most part, and windows 7 or linux using DOS Box, but i digress).

eCom has open office 3.1 as well as fire fox and a bunch of other stuff (QT is a big thing for me as thats what i develop most in these days). If you get some extra cash you should give it a buy. I don't mind the price as i think of it as supporting a company that's working hard to bring OS/2 up to modern day standards.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TCO somebody?
by frajo on Sat 22nd May 2010 13:56 in reply to "Hmm"
frajo Member since:
2007-06-29

I think I'm just missing the "awesome" in this thing.
Is your car awesome?

What can this 1990s time machine do for a "home and student" user, that Linux can't do for free?
It prints 10 times faster than any linux distri. It runs firefox 10 times faster than any linux distri. It has a faster graphics editor (pmview). It runs linux software while linux doesn't run OS/2 software.
Or better yet, Windows 7 that costs around the same amount?
Has TCO a meaning for you?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Hmm
by Karitku on Sat 22nd May 2010 19:57 in reply to "Hmm"
Karitku Member since:
2006-01-12

I think I'm just missing the "awesome" in this thing. 149$ for "home and student"? Are they kidding? What can this 1990s time machine do for a "home and student" user, that Linux can't do for free? Or better yet, Windows 7 that costs around the same amount?


Nothing, lot of people seem to glorify OS/2 and it was rahter okey before XP came. But still it was rather easily crashing(since most programs were large and complex for business), slow fat pig on back thens machines and nowhere suited for Internet as we known it today. I personally don't understand which company would use it either since most companies that had OS/2 were huge govermental organizations with pile of money to burn(like Greeks) and now they are supported by very tiny company. Doesn't look good.

Reply Parent Score: 2