Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 28th May 2010 11:40 UTC
Intel One name was conspicuously absent from the list of companies backing Google's WebM project and the VP8 codec. Despite other chip makers and designers being on the list, like AMD, NVIDIA, ARM, and Qualcomm, Intel didn't make an appearance. Yesterday, the company made its first careful commitment to the WebM project.
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RE[2]: I'm not surprised...
by Kroc on Fri 28th May 2010 12:58 UTC in reply to "RE: I'm not surprised... "
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

Rubbish. How are Intel any less of a target than AMD, ARM, Nividia and Qualcomm who have all baked it and would be just as aware of the legal ramifications (esp. considering some of them use H.264 hardware).

Intel want the good press, without the commitment. They are effectively saying that if WebM becomes big without their help then they will join out of necessity so as not to be left behind, but by not backing it now they are actually inhibiting its ability to become popular since Intel is such a big player. They want it to fail without them but succeed with them so they can ride in and say how much they support the idea and how great it is.

Intel are full of crap. Put your silicon where your mouth is or go away. More and more they seem to be losing the plot.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Intel are full of crap. Put your silicon where your mouth is or go away. More and more they seem to be losing the plot.


Eh, you do realise the other guys haven't done a single thing yet either, right? No chip currently supports this out of the box.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I'm not surprised...
by Kroc on Fri 28th May 2010 13:09 in reply to "RE[3]: I'm not surprised... "
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Right, my mistake; but Intel’s words are still just PR. Of all the companies Google have managed to get backing from at least some hardware must come out of it. They know YouTube/WebM is coming and that’s a big money-spinner if you can claim to have the best performance / battery life when it comes to YouTube.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: I'm not surprised...
by Lazarus on Fri 28th May 2010 13:14 in reply to "RE[3]: I'm not surprised... "
Lazarus Member since:
2005-08-10

Eh, you do realise the other guys haven't done a single thing yet either, right? No chip currently supports this out of the box.


True there is not yet any hardware that does this out of the box, but for whatever it is worth that sizeable list of backers have claimed that they will be adding this support sooner rather than waiting to see if the technology takes off.

That to me at least seems like a big difference between Intel and its competitors. Intel follows when it either seems safe to do so, or when they feel they're going to be left behind if they don't get onboard.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MissTJones Member since:
2010-03-25

Committing publicly to having support in named chipsets on a stated timescale meets and exceeds my definition of having "done a single thing". It is certainly better than than saying you'll wait and see what happens by any measure.

Intel aren't as strong in these markets, their chips are often paired with hardware decoders or GPUs from other manufacturers, but it would be nice to have them on board.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: I'm not surprised...
by kaiwai on Fri 28th May 2010 13:39 in reply to "RE[2]: I'm not surprised... "
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Rubbish. How are Intel any less of a target than AMD, ARM, Nividia and Qualcomm who have all baked it and would be just as aware of the legal ramifications (esp. considering some of them use H.264 hardware).

Intel want the good press, without the commitment. They are effectively saying that if WebM becomes big without their help then they will join out of necessity so as not to be left behind, but by not backing it now they are actually inhibiting its ability to become popular since Intel is such a big player. They want it to fail without them but succeed with them so they can ride in and say how much they support the idea and how great it is.

Intel are full of crap. Put your silicon where your mouth is or go away. More and more they seem to be losing the plot.


As I noted, the CPU was announced in September 2009, the question would have been how easily it would be to add support for VP8 to the processor considering that AMD, ARM and Nvidia don't actually have a product already designed - they've only promised. Quite frankly, I don't give a crap about what ARM promises because they've been ranting and raving about ARM Netbooks for the last year and I haven't seen a single one being sold in New Zealand.

Talk is cheap, anyone can promise to add support for VP8, just as anyone can rant on about ARM Netbooks and mobile Linux - its time that there is less talk, less promises and more delivering those products that have been promised each year by ARM, AMD, Nvidia and co for the last year.

Edited 2010-05-28 13:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

http://distrowatch.com/6095

mobile linux without the empty talk.

Reply Parent Score: 2