Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 28th May 2010 11:40 UTC
Intel One name was conspicuously absent from the list of companies backing Google's WebM project and the VP8 codec. Despite other chip makers and designers being on the list, like AMD, NVIDIA, ARM, and Qualcomm, Intel didn't make an appearance. Yesterday, the company made its first careful commitment to the WebM project.
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RE[3]: I'm not surprised...
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 28th May 2010 13:00 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I'm not surprised... "
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

Intel are full of crap. Put your silicon where your mouth is or go away. More and more they seem to be losing the plot.


Eh, you do realise the other guys haven't done a single thing yet either, right? No chip currently supports this out of the box.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I'm not surprised...
by Kroc on Fri 28th May 2010 13:09 in reply to "RE[3]: I'm not surprised... "
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Right, my mistake; but Intel’s words are still just PR. Of all the companies Google have managed to get backing from at least some hardware must come out of it. They know YouTube/WebM is coming and that’s a big money-spinner if you can claim to have the best performance / battery life when it comes to YouTube.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: I'm not surprised...
by Lazarus on Fri 28th May 2010 13:14 in reply to "RE[3]: I'm not surprised... "
Lazarus Member since:
2005-08-10

Eh, you do realise the other guys haven't done a single thing yet either, right? No chip currently supports this out of the box.


True there is not yet any hardware that does this out of the box, but for whatever it is worth that sizeable list of backers have claimed that they will be adding this support sooner rather than waiting to see if the technology takes off.

That to me at least seems like a big difference between Intel and its competitors. Intel follows when it either seems safe to do so, or when they feel they're going to be left behind if they don't get onboard.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MissTJones Member since:
2010-03-25

Committing publicly to having support in named chipsets on a stated timescale meets and exceeds my definition of having "done a single thing". It is certainly better than than saying you'll wait and see what happens by any measure.

Intel aren't as strong in these markets, their chips are often paired with hardware decoders or GPUs from other manufacturers, but it would be nice to have them on board.

Reply Parent Score: 1