Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 1st Jun 2010 09:42 UTC
Google Google employees have always had a remarkable amount of freedom when it comes to what operating system they wanted to run on company computers - Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, it was all fine. Since the China attacks, however, this has changed: Windows is no longer welcome on Google computers.
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Using Chrome OS
by jibadeeha on Tue 1st Jun 2010 10:15 UTC
jibadeeha
Member since:
2009-08-10

"Google is working on the Linux-based Chrome OS, so promoting internal use of Google products is high on the agenda."

Doubt this would extend to the developers though, as they would surely need access to software development tools, e.g. an IDE, etc.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Using Chrome OS
by woegjiub on Tue 1st Jun 2010 10:19 in reply to "Using Chrome OS"
woegjiub Member since:
2008-11-25

Google uses Ubuntu extensively; there are excellent coding tools in Ubuntu.

Of course, wanting to use google products will cause google to increase the number and power of web applications, chromeOS allows web apps to use client hardware, if I recall correctly.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Using Chrome OS
by Laurence on Tue 1st Jun 2010 12:22 in reply to "RE: Using Chrome OS"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Google uses Ubuntu extensively; there are excellent coding tools in Ubuntu.


Actually no there isn't.

As of 6months ago, much of Android development required a version of Eclipse that's more recent than the latest copy in Ubuntu's software repositories.

This meant that Ubuntu users had to manually download and install Eclipse - ie configure their coding tools from sources outside of Canonical's distros.

Aside that, Ubuntu isn't really that much different from most other Linux distros in terms of development tools.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Using Chrome OS
by jibadeeha on Tue 1st Jun 2010 18:14 in reply to "RE: Using Chrome OS"
jibadeeha Member since:
2009-08-10

Google uses Ubuntu extensively; there are excellent coding tools in Ubuntu.

Of course, wanting to use google products will cause google to increase the number and power of web applications, chromeOS allows web apps to use client hardware, if I recall correctly.


I was referring to the last paragraph in the article, and thinking more along the lines that if Google were to make it's employers eat their own dog food (e.g. using Chrome OS), then this might be somewhat difficult for their developers and probably not a necessary move.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Using Chrome OS
by Windows Sucks on Tue 1st Jun 2010 11:49 in reply to "Using Chrome OS"
Windows Sucks Member since:
2005-11-10

Doubt this would extend to the developers though, as they would surely need access to software development tools, e.g. an IDE, etc.


? Eclipse on Linux is just fine esp if they are coding for Java and Linux. I am sure some people will still be using Windows tools for coding on Windows. Then again maybe they can port to Windows without using Visual Studio?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Using Chrome OS
by delta0.delta0 on Tue 1st Jun 2010 11:57 in reply to "Using Chrome OS"
delta0.delta0 Member since:
2010-06-01

*Face Palm* Seriously ?
How do you think the Linux Kernel is written do you think they use an IDE ? no its called vi or emacs and gcc....

Seriously that has to be the stupidest comment I have read.. Why do you need an IDE to code ? Windows is probably the _WORST_ platform to code on.. The developers are probably already developing using Linux and are probably reading your reply and laughing and mocking you right now..

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[2]: Using Chrome OS
by Laurence on Tue 1st Jun 2010 12:27 in reply to "RE: Using Chrome OS"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

*Face Palm* Seriously ?
How do you think the Linux Kernel is written do you think they use an IDE ? no its called vi or emacs and gcc....

Seriously that has to be the stupidest comment I have read.. Why do you need an IDE to code ? Windows is probably the _WORST_ platform to code on.. The developers are probably already developing using Linux and are probably reading your reply and laughing and mocking you right now..



Vi, emacs and gcc would still be classed as development tools.

<sarcasm>
    Or are you trying to imply that they would use vi / emacs and gcc via a web browser in ChromeOS?
</sarcasm>

Edited 2010-06-01 12:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Using Chrome OS
by bnolsen on Tue 1st Jun 2010 12:40 in reply to "Using Chrome OS"
bnolsen Member since:
2006-01-06

I'm going to have to object on that one. Programming under windows is by no means enjoyable, not in the least. Limited control of system, especially diagnostics, most good free development tools are ported from the unix world, and major headaches with the whole mt, md, etc, etc builds that can't mix and match, subpar support for many many source control systems, gui easily becomes very non responsive during performance testing. I cannot for the life of me understand why people keep repeating that windows is so great for developers.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Using Chrome OS
by moondevil on Tue 1st Jun 2010 13:54 in reply to "RE: Using Chrome OS"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Maybe because we do use the right tools?

I develop for Windows and Unix systems, while it is true that Windows out of the box does not support many of the nice tools Unix seems to have, there are tons of tools to install and ease developers life.

True, many of them are commercial, but if you are developing for leaving what are a few euros, if they make your life easier.


Somehow I feel you don't have real Windows development experience.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Using Chrome OS
by nt_jerkface on Tue 1st Jun 2010 15:56 in reply to "RE: Using Chrome OS"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

most good free development tools are ported from the unix world, and major headaches with the whole mt, md, etc, etc builds that can't mix and match, subpar support for many many source control systems, gui easily becomes very non responsive during performance testing. =


When was the last time you developed in Windows? 1998?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Using Chrome OS
by google_ninja on Tue 1st Jun 2010 18:45 in reply to "RE: Using Chrome OS"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

If you are talking about doing development on windows, chances are you are talking about using visual studio. If you are talking about doing unix development on windows, I understand how that could suck.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Using Chrome OS
by lemur2 on Tue 1st Jun 2010 12:43 in reply to "Using Chrome OS"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Google is working on the Linux-based Chrome OS, so promoting internal use of Google products is high on the agenda."

Doubt this would extend to the developers though, as they would surely need access to software development tools, e.g. an IDE, etc.


http://qt.nokia.com/products/developer-tools
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7yje3D1UM4&feature=player_embedded

http://www.eclipse.org/
http://www.wingware.com/wingide
http://www.kdevelop.org/
http://www.codeblocks.org/

Integrating with the world's premier compiler for multiple platforms:
http://gcc.gnu.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_Compiler_Collection
GCC has been adopted as the standard compiler by most other modern Unix-like computer operating systems, including GNU/Linux, the BSD family and Mac OS X. GCC has been ported to a wide variety of processor architectures, and is widely deployed as a tool in commercial, proprietary and closed source software development environments. GCC is also available for most embedded platforms, for example Symbian, AMCC and Freescale Power Architecture-based chips. The compiler can target a wide variety of platforms, including videogame consoles such as the PlayStation 2 and Dreamcast. Several companies make a business out of supplying and supporting gcc ports to various platforms, and chip manufacturers today consider a GCC port almost essential to the success of an architecture.


Welcome to 2010.

Edited 2010-06-01 12:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Using Chrome OS
by nt_jerkface on Tue 1st Jun 2010 16:04 in reply to "RE: Using Chrome OS"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

His comment was in reference to how Chrome OS only provides a browser.

But thanks once again for providing links that are redundant when it comes to supporting your point.

Now here are a link for you:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pithy

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Using Chrome OS
by jibadeeha on Tue 1st Jun 2010 18:26 in reply to "RE: Using Chrome OS"
jibadeeha Member since:
2009-08-10

""Google is working on the Linux-based Chrome OS, so promoting internal use of Google products is high on the agenda."

Doubt this would extend to the developers though, as they would surely need access to software development tools, e.g. an IDE, etc.


http://qt.nokia.com/products/developer-tools
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7yje3D1UM4&feature=player_embed...

http://www.eclipse.org/
http://www.wingware.com/wingide
http://www.kdevelop.org/
http://www.codeblocks.org/

Integrating with the world's premier compiler for multiple platforms:
http://gcc.gnu.org/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_Compiler_Collection
GCC has been adopted as the standard compiler by most other modern Unix-like computer operating systems, including GNU/Linux, the BSD family and Mac OS X. GCC has been ported to a wide variety of processor architectures, and is widely deployed as a tool in commercial, proprietary and closed source software development environments. GCC is also available for most embedded platforms, for example Symbian, AMCC and Freescale Power Architecture-based chips. The compiler can target a wide variety of platforms, including videogame consoles such as the PlayStation 2 and Dreamcast. Several companies make a business out of supplying and supporting gcc ports to various platforms, and chip manufacturers today consider a GCC port almost essential to the success of an architecture.


Welcome to 2010.
"

Welcome to 2010 - you are so funny ;)

You really didn't need to go to all that trouble in providing all those links, but hey I guess it is your free time and what you enjoy doing.

I am quite aware that GNU/Linux is well supported in terms of development tools at that Chrome OS is based on the Linux kernel.

What I was getting at is this, if Google were to insist employees use Chrome OS then this probably would not extend as far as the developers or support teams unless they modified a version of Chrome OS for this purpose.

Reply Parent Score: 0