Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 1st Jun 2010 09:42 UTC
Google Google employees have always had a remarkable amount of freedom when it comes to what operating system they wanted to run on company computers - Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, it was all fine. Since the China attacks, however, this has changed: Windows is no longer welcome on Google computers.
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RE[3]: Using Chrome OS
by google_ninja on Tue 1st Jun 2010 18:41 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Using Chrome OS"
google_ninja
Member since:
2006-02-05

Similar thing happens with ruby gems, specifically rails.

ruby libs have their own package management system (basically a CPAN clone called rubygems) that does a good enough job. But debian also tracks specific libs in its repo (one of which is rails), so if you do "apt-get install rubygems", you end up with a modified version that spits out an error if you try to install a debian tracked library through gem.

The reason this is retarded is that certain packages (like rails) move WAY faster then the debian repo maintainers. That means that if you install rails on ubuntu the supported way, you end up with an obsolete version that can't be upgraded until the next release. Replacing the crippled ubuntu rubygems install with one off of rubyforge is potentially a non trivial job as well. Finally, if rubygems is an existing system that does a better job then apt for ruby libraries, and is used exclusively by every rubyist, why the hell would you bother trying to fix something that isn't broken?

I think in a general way, apt is great for app installs, but terrible for dev tools, or anything where staying remotely up to date with upstream is desirable.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Using Chrome OS
by bert64 on Wed 2nd Jun 2010 21:20 in reply to "RE[3]: Using Chrome OS"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

It all depends on your usage requirements...

Business and other non technical users want stability, they want one version and to know it isn't going to change significantly or break, but they do want to receive security updates and be able to install them easily. Ubuntu and RHEL are aimed at users like this.

Technical users want to be on the bleeding edge and have all the latest stuff, and are generally clued up enough to deal with compatibility problems that the latest untested software might bring. Gentoo and Arch are aimed at users like this...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Using Chrome OS
by google_ninja on Wed 2nd Jun 2010 23:49 in reply to "RE[4]: Using Chrome OS"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

It all depends on your usage requirements...

Business and other non technical users want stability, they want one version and to know it isn't going to change significantly or break, but they do want to receive security updates and be able to install them easily. Ubuntu and RHEL are aimed at users like this.


It doesn't depend at all on usage requirements. It has to do with pulling stuff out of a package system that is used by everyone into your own, not doing as good a job, and actively preventing people from using the one that is used by everyone. Not only that, but developers are, by their definition, technical users, so dev tools should not be treated the same as other stuff.

Reply Parent Score: 2