Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 1st Jun 2010 23:03 UTC
Microsoft Well, this was pretty inevitable, wasn't it? We had Google employees detailing that their company has pretty much given up on Windows, forcing employees to use either Mac OS X or Linux. In what surely comes as a total surprise, Microsoft has responded to this report. Regarding the security claims, "the facts don't support the assertion", Microsoft states.
Thread beginning with comment 427615
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Blackadder
Member since:
2010-02-03

Because as we all know the only way security can be compromised is malware included specifically within proprietary software. No other forms of threat exist at all.

Reply Parent Score: 3

aliquis Member since:
2005-07-23

"Yes, sure I want a funny frog remembering my passwords!"

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Yes, sure I want a funny frog remembering my passwords!"


"Who cares how it works, as long as it stores my passwords, so I don't have to remember the pesky things.

Thanks for emailing this to me, stranger, that was very generous of you! I really do like the funny frog."

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Because as we all know the only way security can be compromised is malware included specifically within proprietary software. No other forms of threat exist at all.


Other forms of security threat, such as: brute force guessing of passwords, weak passwords, phishing, allowing a malicious attacker physical access to the machine ... all of these apply equally to all types of platform. That is self evident, since the attack vector does not rely on any characteristic of the platfrom/machine/architecture.

However, having said that, the particular form of security threat known as malware DOES rely on a number of characteristics of the target machine. It relies on a known binary API applying to OS of the machine being attacked, it relies on being distributed through closed-source binary packages whose workings are known only to the author, and it relies on the end users of the machine routinely being used to installing closed source binary packages about which they have no ability to audit.

Edited 2010-06-02 01:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6