Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 1st Jun 2010 21:33 UTC
Intel "In an announcement at the International Supercomputing Conference, Intel provided further details on the many-core chip that it hinted at earlier in the month. The first product based on the new design will be codenamed Knight's Corner, and will debut at 22nm with around 50 x86 cores on the same die. Developer kits, which include a prototype of the design called Knight's Ferry, have been shipping to select partners for a while now, and will ship more broadly in the second half of the year. When Intel moves to 22nm in 2011, Knight's Corner will make its official debut."
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Comment by Neolander
by Neolander on Wed 2nd Jun 2010 07:41 UTC
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

This "multiple low-powered core" technology is not gonna last on the desktop, the day people realize that only few problems scale well accross multiple cores.

For virtualization-oriented servers, on the other hand, putting that together with NUMA could do wonders. But as other people around, I think that bus bandwidth issues will kill this product.

Edited 2010-06-02 07:42 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Neolander
by rom508 on Wed 2nd Jun 2010 09:49 in reply to "Comment by Neolander"
rom508 Member since:
2007-04-20

This "multiple low-powered core" technology is not gonna last on the desktop, the day people realize that only few problems scale well accross multiple cores.


You mean only few software programs scale well across multiple cores. There are many problems that can be decomposed into parallel tasks, you just need to build your software from the ground up to take advantage of large number of parallel execution units.

There are many things people do on desktop machines that benefit from multicore processors: audio/video encoding, digital photography, data rendering, be it a complex 3D scene or office/web document. And many new problems can be created to fill the demand for such hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by Neolander
by reduz on Wed 2nd Jun 2010 16:55 in reply to "Comment by Neolander"
reduz Member since:
2006-02-25

No one says that all existing software or all existing types of software should scale to multiple cores. It's more an issue of existing software taking advantage of parallel processing for different kinds of tasks.

Software like photoshop, 3ds max, even web browsers (scaling javascript and the rendering processes) can be modified to take advantage. Audio software can greatly be benefitted too (run multiple virtual effects/synthesizers each on a separate core), and of course videogames (physics simulation, renderingm etc).

So the target is to give more power to existing software, not asking it to be rewritten...

Reply Parent Score: 2