Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 4th Jun 2010 15:36 UTC
Internet & Networking Earlier this week, Apple launched a HTML5 Showcase page, displaying several uses for HTML5 and related technologies. However, it turns out that Apple is using trickery to block out browsers other than Safari, with the end result that browsers with better support for web standards than Safari can't access the demos.
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RE[6]: Still unclear
by Nelson on Fri 4th Jun 2010 19:11 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Still unclear"
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

But Silverlight only works on Windows and Intel Macs. Linux doesn’t count because that’s not actual, official Silverlight and might not work with certain features or certain distros at the behest of Microsoft. Where is that Moonlight VC-1 binary blob for ARM?


And Symbian, and Windows Phone. The Moonlight plugin is remarkably advanced, and with a little elbow grease, I can and have gotten my RIAs to render just fine.

It's usually a case of hopping on a mailing list or on irc and talking to the moonlight hackers, so it does take a little work, but I don't think it's stated enough how close they are to feature parity with eachother.


One day you will sit in front of your computer and realise that Silverlight has been a complete dead-end waste of time that has tied you to an awful company that is completely behind the times and unable to innovate in the web space and you will be forced to accept that HTML has won because it doesn’t need to be installed, it doesn’t wait for Microsoft and it works on all devices on all platforms on all architectures and it is the _only_ way to get content to everybody because there will never be plugin monopoly in the mobile space with the diversity of hardware and operating systems that are appearing.


I realize the plugin situation is not ideal, which is why I'd push for deeper integration of Silverlight beyond the constraints of the plugin frameworks for the various browsers.

Silverlight is more than a browser technology, and as it, and WPF converge, it will emerge as the true cross platform programming solution.

I'd like to see it have first citizen support in browsers along side HTML, and eventually replace HTML, CSS, Javascript, and SVG.

It always took someone breaking compatiblity and pioneering for any real change to come about on the web. As the web and the client side of apps become more blured, Silverlight will come more into focus.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: Still unclear
by siimo on Fri 4th Jun 2010 21:53 in reply to "RE[6]: Still unclear"
siimo Member since:
2006-06-22

You want Silverlight to replace HTML? Can I have some of what you are smoking?

Silverlight isn't open, its Microsoft's, and right now they are helping Novel with Moonlight, does not mean they wont sue in the future.

This will be HTML5 video all over again...

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[7]: Still unclear
by Moochman on Sat 5th Jun 2010 09:52 in reply to "RE[6]: Still unclear"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

Silverlight is more than a browser technology, and as it, and WPF converge, it will emerge as the true cross platform programming solution.


Silverlight doesn't offer anything that Flash doesn't. In fact Flash has arguably better support for native apps than Silverlight, since with AIR you can with zero effort create cross-platform binaries for Windows, Mac and Linux. You might argue that for certain use cases Microsoft's programming tools are more capable, but Adobe also has the edge when it comes to design tools, so I'd call it a draw.

Flash however is available on far more platforms than Silverlight and and is more open than Silverlight--open spec and to some extent (Flex) open source. Yet look how much heat it is getting, with Adobe already planning for a long-term transition plan to HTML5.

Will Silverlight support on the web grow before it dies out? Maybe. But as a web technology, it will eventually die out, of that you can be sure.

(barring a miraculous change of heart by Microsoft to standardize and open-source it... ;) )

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[8]: Still unclear
by Nelson on Sat 5th Jun 2010 21:30 in reply to "RE[7]: Still unclear"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29


Silverlight doesn't offer anything that Flash doesn't. In fact Flash has arguably better support for native apps than Silverlight, since with AIR you can with zero effort create cross-platform binaries for Windows, Mac and Linux.


Uh, how about a coherent programming model. Flash is all over the place. JITed C# is leaps and bounds faster than AS at computation.

A set of standard LOB controls (charts, datagrids, et all), a variety of options for animations: timeline, keyframed, with easing operations and acceleration on the GPU using bitmap caching.

Maybe once upon a time AIR might have held some advantages, but with SL4 Silverlight got Full Trust, Printing, Drag and Drop, and Notifications .. all once checkmarks in AIRs bracket... but no more.

Now the programming, tooling, and performance superiority of Silverlight triumphs over AIR.

AIR is all over the place. It's a mash of different technologies, you can go the web route, you can go the flash route, or you can do a combination of both. There's no coherence.


You might argue that for certain use cases Microsoft's programming tools are more capable, but Adobe also has the edge when it comes to design tools, so I'd call it a draw.


Sorry the Expression Suite and Visual Studio absolutely dominate over any offering that Adobe has in tooling. In pure profiling and debugging tooling, it's not even close.


Flash however is available on far more platforms than Silverlight and and is more open than Silverlight--open spec and to some extent (Flex) open source. Yet look how much heat it is getting, with Adobe already planning for a long-term transition plan to HTML5.


XAML, C#, and the CLI are ECMA standards.


Will Silverlight support on the web grow before it dies out? Maybe. But as a web technology, it will eventually die out, of that you can be sure.

(barring a miraculous change of heart by Microsoft to standardize and open-source it... ;) )


You can standardize it and survive, open sourcing something is not a necessity for success. Perhaps in your dream world, but certainly not in the real world.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Still unclear
by emerson999 on Sat 5th Jun 2010 22:30 in reply to "RE[6]: Still unclear"
emerson999 Member since:
2007-12-08

Different people, different experiences, and all that. But from my use, I've never actually seen moonlight work on anything I tried that wasn't specifically designed for it. Every time I've seen something done for silverlight, it hasn't worked in moonlight. It's great that if someone puts some extra work into their code, they might be able to make it cross platform. But the reality is that when it comes to silverlight nobody does.

And they shouldn't have to. If something's cross platform, it should work across all platforms without essentially needing a half port.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Still unclear
by Slambert666 on Mon 7th Jun 2010 09:36 in reply to "RE[7]: Still unclear"
Slambert666 Member since:
2008-10-30

Just design and test for Moonlight. If it works on Moonlight it will work on Silverlight also.

Reply Parent Score: 1