Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 4th Jun 2010 22:36 UTC
Google When Google first unveiled its WebM project, there were quite some concerns over its license. This license was incompatible with version 2 and 3 of the GPL, and was effectively a new license, causing unnecessary confusion. Google has now cleared everything up by switching to a regular BSD license.
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RE[4]: GPL
by KAMiKAZOW on Sun 6th Jun 2010 21:08 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: GPL"
KAMiKAZOW
Member since:
2005-07-06

We would not have WebKit without LGPL -- Apple would not have given any of KHTML code back the community unless they were forced to!

You mean like Apple does with LLVM and Clang?
Oh, no. Seems you're wrong. LLVM and Clang are BSD-licensed and Apple still develops it fully in the open and does not create a closed source fork.

From the overall WebKit code base, only WebCore and JSCore are LGPLed. All the rest is BSD-licensed.

Apple owns the entire source code to CUPS. Apple is not forced to produce an open source version. Same with Darwin Streaming Server, Calendar Server, launchd, Bonjour, ...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[5]: GPL
by miker on Mon 7th Jun 2010 13:47 in reply to "RE[4]: GPL"
miker Member since:
2009-07-08

I disagree.

Webkits performance results in a superior user experience over other browsers. The last thing Apple would want is for their competitors to be apple to provide comparable performance, it is just something apple has to live with.

LLVM and CLANG began as university research projects, had they originated with apple they might note be open source.

Even if they had originated at apple, they do not provide any benefit that is visible to the end-user, so from the Apple perspective they don't lose anything by sharing the source code.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: GPL
by Neolander on Mon 7th Jun 2010 14:15 in reply to "RE[5]: GPL"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I disagree.

Webkits performance results in a superior user experience over other browsers. The last thing Apple would want is for their competitors to be apple to provide comparable performance, it is just something apple has to live with.

LLVM and CLANG began as university research projects, had they originated with apple they might note be open source.

Even if they had originated at apple, they do not provide any benefit that is visible to the end-user, so from the Apple perspective they don't lose anything by sharing the source code.

Exactly. An open-source software which originated with Apple still remains to be seen. On the other hand, things like the App store...

Edited 2010-06-07 14:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2