Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 7th Jun 2010 19:11 UTC
Apple As everybody already expected, Apple "unveiled" the new iPhone tonight. It's called the iPhone 4, and brings the iPhone up to par with what's already available on other smartphone platforms, hardware wise, while raising the bar on a few specific points (the display, mostly). The company also announced a name change for its mobile operating system - it's now called iOS. What we didn't get during this year's WWDC keynote? News about the Mac, Mac OS X, or the Apple TV. Make no mistake: the iPhone and iPad is where it's at.
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RE: No news...
by daveak on Mon 7th Jun 2010 19:59 UTC in reply to "No news..."
daveak
Member since:
2008-12-29


Shame that their video chat is incompatible with existing 3G video


Why?

equipped phones. On the plus side they are using higher quality codecs than existing standards I guess, and their protocols are internet-oriented rather than 3G-network-only. Perhaps the higher


Right now there's loads of phones here in the UK that can make video calls, but I don't know anybody here who has ever made or received one.


You kind of make my point. 3G video call support exists but isn't used by anyone, so why bother supporting an unused standard when you can support standards that are in large scale use across multiple platforms?

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: No news...
by steve_s on Mon 7th Jun 2010 22:07 in reply to "RE: No news..."
steve_s Member since:
2006-01-16

The point I made was that whilst it may be true that in the UK and the USA almost nobody makes 3G video calls, this is not universally true in every territory.

As I said in my post, people in Korea do use video calls on their phones. There's a lot of people in Korea. Apple even sells the iPhone there.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: No news...
by l3v1 on Tue 8th Jun 2010 06:10 in reply to "RE: No news..."
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

You kind of make my point. 3G video call support exists but isn't used by anyone, so why bother supporting an unused standard when you can support standards that are in large scale use across multiple platforms?


The world is bigger than the U.S. And the U.S. mobile arena hasn't exactly been a world leader technology-wise (let alone pricing &co. but that's another issue).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: No news...
by daveak on Tue 8th Jun 2010 07:18 in reply to "RE[2]: No news..."
daveak Member since:
2008-12-29

What does the U.S have to do with it? Name a country where 3G video calls are common place (you may have South Korea as has already been mentioned). Name all the countries with significant mobile phone infrastructure where they aren't. The latter will vastly outnumber the former. The networks across Europe paid large sums of money for 3G spectrum and tried to push video calls. They failed.

Reply Parent Score: 3