Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 11th Jun 2010 21:56 UTC
Windows Yes, the day is finally drawing closer: the day Windows XP died. October 22, 2010 will be the final and definitive day for the venerable operating system, since OEMs will no longer be able to pre-load it on netbooks after that day. I might not make myself popular around here with this, but thank god, it's about time that pile of junk is taken behind the shed.
Thread beginning with comment 429788
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
comment by kedwards
by kedwards on Sat 12th Jun 2010 01:11 UTC
kedwards
Member since:
2009-04-25

Microsoft always had a hard time killing over previous versions of Windows. I remember when people were holding onto Windows 98 with dear life. Windows XP will die off once it stops being a good user eXPerience.

Reply Score: 1

RE: comment by kedwards
by darknexus on Sat 12th Jun 2010 01:25 in reply to "comment by kedwards"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Windows XP will die off once it stops being a good user eXPerience.


If that were true, it would've died off in favor of something else several years ago. XP will die off once the corporate intranet in-house apps don't rely on it, and when users are brave enough to leave their comfort zone. It's not so much that XP provides a good experience, it provides a familiar experience, and familiarity will win over awesomeness in the minds of many. Vista, and now 7, were a departure from the traditional Windows experience. XP, despite its eye candy and newer NT-based underpinnings, still behaved exactly like 9x as did 2000 before it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: comment by kedwards
by kedwards on Sat 12th Jun 2010 04:20 in reply to "RE: comment by kedwards"
kedwards Member since:
2009-04-25

If that were true, it would've died off in favor of something else several years ago. XP will die off once the corporate intranet in-house apps don't rely on it, and when users are brave enough to leave their comfort zone. It's not so much that XP provides a good experience, it provides a familiar experience, and familiarity will win over awesomeness in the minds of many. Vista, and now 7, were a departure from the traditional Windows experience. XP, despite its eye candy and newer NT-based underpinnings, still behaved exactly like 9x as did 2000 before it.


So you are saying Windows XP doesn't provide a good user experience to its users? They cannot run the programs they want to run? They cannot operate the hardware they want to operate? To many users, the interface being familiar and able to use the software/hardware they want to use is a good user experience. Once a user finds out that Windows XP cannot operate a new piece of software/hardware they want to use, will migrate to a new version.

Edited 2010-06-12 04:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2